Week 10: Common Health Conditions with Implications for Women Part 1

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Week 10: Common Health Conditions with Implications for Women, Part 1

Week 10: Common Health Conditions with Implications for Women Part 1

Discussion: Diagnosing and Managing Common Cardiovascular and Neurologic Conditions

Cardiovascular and neurologic conditions are among the leading causes of death and hospitalization of women in the United States (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008a). As an advanced practice nurse, you must routinely monitor patients at risk of these conditions and recommend the appropriate health screenings and preventive services. When assessing patients for these conditions, it is important to keep in mind that while some female patients might present with typical signs and symptoms, others might present with atypical signs and symptoms that are unique to women. For this Discussion, consider signs and symptoms presented by the women in the following case studies and develop differential diagnoses:

Case Study 1

A 48-year-old overweight African American female is in the clinic for a wellness visit. A routine fasting lipid panel returned with the following results:

·        Total cholesterol: 305 mmol/L

·        Low-density lipoprotein (LDL): 180 mg/dl

·        High-density lipoprotein (HDL): 30 mg/dl

·        Triglycerides: 165 mg/dl

Case Study 2

You are seeing a 63-year-old African American female for a two-week history of intermittent chest pain. The pain varies in intensity and resolves with rest. She does not believe it has increased over time. She is a nonsmoker with a history of hypertension treated with Lisinopril 10 mg once daily. She had an exercise stress test one year ago that was within normal limits. Her physical exam findings are as follows: HR–90, BP–150/92, R–22, O2Sat 98% RA; lungs: clear to auscultation bilaterally; cardiovascular: apical pulse of 90 RRR, no rubs, murmurs, or gallops. Chest wall mildly tender to palpation that reproduces her complaint of pain. Extremities include no clubbing, cyanosis, or edema. The remainder of the exam is within normal limits.

Case Study 3

A 32-year-old Asian American female is in the clinic for a history of recurrent headaches for the past year, occurring monthly, lasting up to 12–18 hours. The headaches are sometimes associated with photophobia, nausea, and vomiting. She takes either acetaminophen or ibuprofen for relief that is not always successful. She uses Ortho Tricyclin for birth control. Her physical exam is within normal limits.

To prepare:

·        Review Chapter 8 of the Tharpe et al. text and the McSweeney et al. article in this week’s Learning Resources.

·        Review and select one of the three provided case studies. Analyze the patient information.

·        Consider a differential diagnosis for the patient in the case study you selected. Think about the most likely diagnosis for the patient.

·

·        Reflect on the appropriate clinical guidelines. Think about a treatment and management plan for the patient. Be sure to consider appropriate dosages for any recommended pharmacologic and/or nonpharmacologic treatments.

·        Consider strategies for educating patients on the treatment and management of the disorder you identified as your primary diagnosis.

Post at least 250 words

1.     an explanation of the differential diagnosis for the patient in the case study you selected.

2.     Explain which is the most likely diagnosis for the patient and why.

3.     Then, based on the appropriate clinical guidelines, explain a treatment and management plan for the patient, including proper dosages for any recommended treatments.

4.     Finally, explain strategies for educating patients on the disorder.

It also describes the presentation, assessment, diagnosis, and management of various systemic conditions, including cardiovascular and neurologic conditions.McSweeney, J. C., Pettey, C. M., Souder, E., & Rhoads, S. (2011). Disparities in Women’s cardiovascular health. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing, 40(3), 362–371.oThis article explores health disparities in cardiovascular disease, including gender and racial disparities related to the diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of patients with this disease

Common Health Conditions with Implications for Women

Common Health Conditions with Implications for Women

Select a patient that you examined during the last four weeks as a Nurse Practitioner. Select a female patient with common endocrine or musculoskeletal conditions, Evaluate differential diagnoses for common endocrine or musculoskeletal conditions you chose .With this patient in mind, address the following in a SOAP Note:

 

Subjective: What details did the patient provide regarding or her personal and medical history?

 

Objective: What observations did you make during the physical assessment?

 

Assessment: What were your differential diagnoses? Provide a minimum of three possible diagnoses. List them from highest priority to lowest priority. What was your primary diagnosis and why?

 

Plan: What was your plan for diagnostics and primary diagnosis? What was your plan for treatment and management, including alternative therapies? Include pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments, alternative therapies, and follow-up appointment with the provideras well as a rationale for this treatment and management plan.

 

Reflection notes: What would you do differently in a similar patient evaluation? And how can you relate this to your class and clinical readings.

 

 

 

References

 

Schuiling, K. D., & Likis, F. E. (2013). Women’s gynecologic health (2nd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

 

Common Health Conditions with Implications for Women

Common Health Conditions with Implications for Women

 

Chapter 22, “Urinary Tract Infection in Women” (pp. 535–546)

 

Tharpe, N. L., Farley, C., & Jordan, R. G. (2013). Clinical practice guidelines for midwifery & Women’s health (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Publishers.

 

Review: Chapter 8, “Primary Care in Women’s Health” (pp. 431–560)

 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2012b). Women’s health. Retrieved from

 

National Institutes of Health. (2012). Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH).

 

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2012a). Womenshealth.gov. Retrieved from

 

ORDER NOW FOR AN ORIGINAL PAPER ASSIGNMENT: Wee 10: Common Health Conditions with Implications for Women   Part I

You must proofread your paper. But do not strictly rely on your computer’s spell-checker and grammar-checker; failure to do so indicates a lack of effort on your part and you can expect your grade to suffer accordingly. Papers with numerous misspelled words and grammatical mistakes will be penalized. Read over your paper – in silence and then aloud – before handing it in and make corrections as necessary. Often it is advantageous to have a friend proofread your paper for obvious errors. Handwritten corrections are preferable to uncorrected mistakes.

Use a standard 10 to 12 point (10 to 12 characters per inch) typeface. Smaller or compressed type and papers with small margins or single-spacing are hard to read. It is better to let your essay run over the recommended number of pages than to try to compress it into fewer pages.

Likewise, large type, large margins, large indentations, triple-spacing, increased leading (space between lines), increased kerning (space between letters), and any other such attempts at “padding” to increase the length of a paper are unacceptable, wasteful of trees, and will not fool your professor.

The paper must be neatly formatted, double-spaced with a one-inch margin on the top, bottom, and sides of each page. When submitting hard copy, be sure to use white paper and print out using dark ink. If it is hard to read your essay, it will also be hard to follow your argument.

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