NURS 6053 Power Dynamics Discussion

Want create site? With Free visual composer you can do it easy.

NURS 6053 Power Dynamics Discussion

NURS 6053 Power Dynamics Discussion

 

There is no graded Discussion Board assignment this week;
however, a Week 6 optional discussion board is available for your voluntary
participation. Bring to mind a nurse whose words, behaviors, or reputation
convey power. What is it about this individual that suggests power? How does
your perception of this person relate to your view of yourself as a nurse
leader and the image you associate with nursing?

Click on the Reply button below to reveal the textbox for
entering your message. Then click on the Submit button to post your message.

Rucker and his colleagues found that audiences who felt powerful were more swayed by pitches that focused on competence and skillfulness, whereas those who felt powerless were more persuaded by pitches that emphasized warmth and sincerity. This research challenges a long-discussed assumption that powerful people always hold sway and powerless people are always easier to bend.

Learn more about Kellogg’s executive education program on strategic marketing communications in the digital age here.

Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS:NURS 6053 Power Dynamics Discussion

Rucker and his coauthors—David Dubois of INSEAD and Adam Galinsky of Columbia University—explored the relationship between power and persuasion in four experiments. The experiments rely on techniques to temporarily affect how powerful participants feel in the moment. In one experiment, for instance, participants were asked to write sentences using either powerful words (like “authority” and “dominates”) or powerless ones (like “obey” and “submits”). In another, participants were told to recall an instance in which they felt either powerful or powerless.

After being placed into a state of low or high power, participants were assigned to be either communicators or audience members. Communicators were tasked with persuading the audience to, for example, use a new gym facility or dine at a specific restaurant. In multiple experiments, the researchers had either “high-power communicators” or “low-power communicators” deliver messages to “high-power audiences” or “low-power audiences.”

Across the experiments, the researchers observed two clear trends.

First, the power of the communicator influenced the type of arguments they used. High-power communicators gravitated toward more competence-related arguments, whereas low-power communicators used more warmth-related arguments.

Second, high-power audiences were more persuaded by messages from high-power communicators. And low-power audiences were more persuaded by messages from low-power communicators.

Did you find apk for android? You can find new Free Android Games and apps.