NURS 6051 Discussion: The Application of Data to Problem-Solving

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RE: Discussion – Week 1

            In the state of California we are able to retrieve immunization records from the internet and can even access this from a mobile phone despite where and when the vaccine was administered. The flaw in this is that if that facility fails to upload the vaccination administration record properly is that it may not populate on the vaccination record within our state. An example I would like to provide is my wife’s situation. She currently works in a long-term facility where she had received all doses of her Moderna vaccine plus the booster. Her workplace still after months has not been able to send her information to be uploaded which has ultimately caused a delay with a lack of displayed information.

According to Atkinson (2020), studies have shown that approximately 10-60% of immunization records lack proper documentation of these immunizations or contain errors. I agree with your idea with having a “centralized” system to access immunization records for all patients. It would help with vaccine administration and promote an increase in maintaining vaccination schedules for all. The main problem we currently are dealing with in healthcare are people who are unvaccinated for COVID-19. The more we can vaccinate, the less prone our country becomes in prolonging the pandemic. Pediatric immunizations are extremely crucial, and enforcing the 9 vaccine preventable diseases show a reduction over time by 90% of the diseases to be eradicated (Scharf et. al, 2021).

References

Atkinson, K. M., Mithani, S. S., Bell, C., Rubens-Augustson, T., & Wilson, K. (2020). The digital immunization system of the future: imagining a patient-centric, interoperable immunization information system. Therapeutic advances in vaccines and immunotherapy8, 2515135520967203. https://doi.org/10.1177/2515135520967203

Scharf, L. G., Coyle, R., Adeniyi, K., Fath, J., Harris, L., Myerburg, S., Kurilo, M. B., & Abbott, E. (2021). Current challenges and future possibilities for immunization information systems. Academic pediatrics21(4S), S57–S64. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2020.11.008

NURS 6051 Discussion: The Application of Data to Problem-Solving

In the modern era, there are few professions that do not to some extent rely on data. Stockbrokers rely on market data to advise clients on financial matters. Meteorologists rely on weather data to forecast weather conditions, while realtors rely on data to advise on the purchase and sale of property. In these and other cases, data not only helps solve problems, but adds to the practitioner’s and the discipline’s body of knowledge.

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RE: Discussion – Week 1

Initial Post

Informatics is used to provide solutions for problems related to data, information, and knowledge processing. To study general principles of processing data information and knowledge in medicine and healthcare. Informatics as a technological advancement has now extended into healthcare in several ways, starting with the HITECH act of 2009 signed into law by then President Barrack Obama, this act mandates Electronic Health Records (EHR) by all healthcare providers (HHS.GOV). Doctors and nurses of today are benefiting from this technological advancement than our predecessors. For example, the issue of not understanding some people’s handwriting especially the doctors, has been eliminated with the implementation of the Electronic Health Record (HER).

I currently work full time with a Hospice company, I have used home care home base and currently using Kinnser. Home care Home base (HCHB) is one of the most popular software used by hospice companies. With HCHB and Kinnser, patient’s health information and health history can be more easily accessed by providers, doctors, nurses, and pharmacy if they have access. This reduces the associated risk of losing patient’s information and medication errors. It notifies you when medication is duplicated and medications with end date like antibiotics falls off when it is completed. It enables doctors to sign orders electronically and enable pharmacies view the order electronically. The benefit here is as healthcare informatics continues to evolve so will patient outcome because as more information pertaining to informatics are made known to providers and caregivers, the more educated they are becoming which will in turn improve patient’s care.

Scenario

According to the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention “A medication error is any preventable event that may cause or lead to inappropriate medication use or patient harm while the medication is in the control of the health care professional, patient, or consumers” (Rxr@usp.org, 2015). I can recall a situation when a patient on Crisis Care (CC) is allergic to morphine and morphine was sent out because it is a regular medication used for pain management and short of breath. With the help of Kinnser, I was able to look up the patient’s allergies and found out that the patient was allergic to morphine and notified the doctor to give order for alternative pain management medication.  “Medication errors occur in all settings and may or may not cause an adverse drug event (ADE). The most common causes of medication errors were human factors (65.2 percent), among other factors such as packaging, labelling miscommunication and so on.” (Hughes, 2008).

Conclusion

EHR is significant in the prevention and or reduction of medical errors and assist healthcare workers to improve patient care. In addition, EHR advances the way healthcare professionals communicate, access and share healthcare data. It also facilitates efficient patient care while reducing and preventing medical errors that can be costly or fatal. “Recently, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) released the 2018 Annual Update on the Adoption of a Nationwide System for Electronic Use and Exchange of Health Information. The annual report is an opportunity for the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to provide an update on the progress of a nationwide health information technology (health IT) infrastructure that allows for the electronic access and use of health information” (Thomas, S., 2019).

References

HHS Office of the Secretary, Office for Civil Rights, & Ocr. (2017, June 16). HITECH Act Enforcement Interim Final Rule. Retrieved August 31, 2020, from https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/special-topics/hitech-act-enforcement-interim-final-rule/index.html

Hughes, R. (2008, April 08). Patient Safety and Quality. Retrieved August 31, 2020, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2651/

Rxr@usp.org. (2015, January 30). About Medication Errors. Retrieved August 31, 2020, from https://www.nccmerp.org/about-medication-errors

Thomas, S., (2019) The Current State of Health IT and EHR in America. Policy & Medicine              Retrieved August 31, 2020, from https://www.policymed.com/2019/03/the-current-state-of-health-it-and-ehr-in-america.html

Of course, the nursing profession also relies heavily on data. The field of nursing informatics aims to make sure nurses have access to the appropriate date to solve healthcare problems, make decisions in the interest of patients, and add to knowledge.

In this Discussion, you will consider a scenario that would benefit from access to data and how such access could facilitate both problem-solving and knowledge formation.

To Prepare:

Reflect on the concepts of informatics and knowledge work as presented in the Resources.

Consider a hypothetical scenario based on your own healthcare practice or organization that would require or benefit from the access/collection and application of data. Your scenario may involve a patient, staff, or management problem or gap. NURS 6051 Discussion: The Application of Data to Problem-Solving

By Day 3 of Week 1

Post a description of the focus of your scenario. Describe the data that could be used and how the data might be collected and accessed. What knowledge might be derived from that data? How would a nurse leader use clinical reasoning and judgment in the formation of knowledge from this experience?

RE: Discussion – Week 1

Informatics is a continuously developing aspect of healthcare that leads to positive advancements in how healthcare providers deliver care and monitor client’s healthcare status. Nursing informatics plays an important role into today’s healthcare system because of technology enhancements and a drive for evidence-based practice standards.  Informatics has multiple functions, including data collection, research driven findings, quality improvement efforts, and the use of electronic medical records. Additionally, nursing informatics is prevalent in both the inpatient and outpatient setting with a goal to improve client outcomes and nursing practice.

One area of informatics that nurses utilize on a daily basis is data collection. This data collection can consist of items such as patient demographics, research/survey findings, and knowledge gained from information processing. According to McGonigle, D. and Mastrian K.G. (2018), “the data that are processed into information must be of high quality and integrity to create meaning to inform assessments and decision making” (p. 23).  Utilizing data collection is vital in improving care provided to patients and improving healthcare outcomes.

Additionally, according to Junger, A, Nagle, L.M., and Sermeus, W. (2017), “nurse informatics specialists will be pivotal in assisting to identify potential ethical and practice implications in the use of these data” (p. 217).  In other words, the implementation of nursing informatics (with a focus on data collection), contributes to quality improvement efforts and affects how nurses provide care. Additionally, according to Sweeney, J. (2017), “information systems in the managerial role often consist of interpreting information and modifying data to be utilized in decision-making processes” (para. 7). The above implies that findings from data collection impacts decisions made in planning quality improvement projects or changing policies.

The access, collection, and application of data is relevant in my current practice as a public health nurse. One specific scenario that I plan to apply data collection and processing to is improving retention rates for latent tuberculosis (LTBI) clients who receive care at the Virginia Department of Health (VDH). I am currently the LTBI coordinator and VDH initiated a new quality improvement project for LTBI clients in January 2020. The quality improvement project focused on having clients scheduled into an appointment slot to pick up their LTBI medications. Previously before the current project was implemented, clients were able to walk in and any nurse available performed the client assessment and medication administration. The previous process led to disruption to the flow of other clinics and led to nurses staying after close due to clients arriving ten minutes before VDH closed.

The current LTBI project has not been as effective as planned and has not led to the expected increase in retention rates of LTBI clients. One hypothetical scenario that I have been contemplating is collecting data to revise the current LTBI project and initiate appointment slots that are easily attended by the patients. The current appointment slots are in the morning on the first and third Monday. I have found that morning appointments are not easily obtainable for our LTBI clients due to their work schedules or child’s school schedule.

Additionally, all LTBI clients are Refugees and use public transportation to arrive to appointments. In order to revise the current program, it is necessary to collect data on appointment attendance rates. I can examine appointment attendance rates by collaborating with the OSS supervisor to pull electronic client records and encounter forms. Additionally, I believe a good method to improve client attendance rates would be to provide clients with a survey to determine what appointment slots would work better with their current schedules. I have found that when I have performed unplanned LTBI clinics in the afternoon, more clients showed for appointments.

Another piece of data that is beneficial to examine is the number of clients who have completed LTBI treatment since the current LTBI project’s implementation. I can collect this data by reviewing the LTBI Excel database and reviewing LTBI client charts. It is beneficial to compare the number of clients who have completed LTBI treatment a year before the new project was implemented to the current number of clients who have completed therapy under the current LTBI program.

By gathering all of the above data, I am able to assess if the current LTBI program is more effective than the previous medication pickup process. Additionally, by allowing clients to have their own input (through a survey), VDH can assess what revisions may need to occur. The new LTBI program may be beneficial for the VDH nursing staff, but not necessarily for the patients. Overall, by gathering data on current appointment attendance rates and examining the number of clients who have completed LTBI treatment in the past and present, VDH gains knowledge on how to best keep clients adherent to completing LTBI treatment. I can use the knowledge gained from collecting LTBI data to revise the current program and enhance client appointment attendance. Overall, as a nurse leader, I can use clinical reasoning from knowledge gained to improve LTBI patient care and positively influence VDH nursing practice.

 

Reference List

Junger, A., Nagle L.M., & Sermeus W. (2017). Evolving role of the nursing informatics

specialist. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 232, 212-221.

doi: 10.3233/978-1-61499-738-2-212.

McGonigle D. & Mastrian K.G. (2018). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge

(4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Sweeney, J. (2017). Healthcare informatics. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 21(1).

retrieved from http://www.himss.org/ojni

According to Kollerup, et al, in a study to test a 12-step process in medication management post hospitalization, a common issue was identified.

The hospital’s changes in medication led the nurse to reconsider the prescriptions in the light of the patient’s current needs. Establishing order in the medication lists subsequently involved contacts with the hospital, the GP, nursing assistants and the family. Medication issues could not always be resolved during the initial visit, and a follow‐up visit was often required.  (Kollerup, et al 2018)

As a community health nurse, since 2018, I have witnessed the challenges of medication reconciliation.  I have entered homes with a discharge list including a short list of medications, however, when I arrive at the patient’s home, I get the “tour”.  We amble from cabinet to cabinet, tackle box to tackle box, drawer to drawer.  I gather dozens of bottles of medications that the patient is determined to continue taking, while disregarding the new list that was established by the last MD office visit or the last hospitalization.  Sometimes, these bottles include a hodge-podge of random and most definitely expired pills poured into a bottle.  The patient is adamant that they have no difficulty taking their medications, that they are knowledgeable about the dosing and side effects and absolutely need no teaching currently.   However, as an experienced clinician, I concur with the opinion of the infamous and sassy, television star, “House”-EVERYBODY LIES!  Not really, but this thought does cross my mind from time to time.

This creates a challenge for the home health nurse, we must then, quickly gain the trust of the patient and their caregiver, obtain orders from the MD, provide education, and ensure that all appropriate medications are sorted and taken appropriately.

You make be asking yourself, what does this have to do with data collection?  My current, and much appreciated career within the home health umbrella is working as a clinical supervisor.  It is my job to be a “data detective”.  I spend my entire day, reviewing documentation, approving orders, ensuring accuracy, promoting positive outcomes, and improving the satisfaction of the patient and the caregiver.  I have a “hot topic book” in which I keep track of the “data” where I notice trends.  I determine weaknesses in documentation and failures in planning.  For example:  my current hot topics are infection reporting, occurrence reporting, order writing, pain assessment, medication reconciliation.  I am new again, to the state of Florida, therefore, new to this company.  The company is currently scoring low in satisfaction and low in the “STAR RATING”.  It is my responsibility to improve these outcomes.  I have been actively providing education to the skilled nurses that perform the assessments to improve the outcomes in these identified areas.  The patient is at significant risk for injury, decline in health status, rehospitalization and possibly death if medications are not reconciled correctly upon discharge from the hospital or MD office.

In, Masetti, et al, it is stated in their study of medication problems upon discharge from a hospital, that in addition to the known risk factors in patients transferring from hospital to home care (age, polymedication, multiple providers), 3 major problems impacted upon medication safety: fragmented communication, unreliable medication availability and a poor prescription quality. Clinical pharmacists are an important option to improve medication safety assessment.  (Masetti, et al 2018).

The data that I gather and interpret is utilized to provide education to the skilled nurses on my teams.  I am not re-inventing the wheel or re-creating processes.  I often get frustrated because the skill of medication reconciliation should be a basic nursing skill.  This important and key step in the assessment process is often overlooked or rushed.  The nurses need to gain confidence in dealing with the complicated family dynamics and in communication with the MD office.

Medication reconciliation ensures that the patient has a correct list of medications, but many other issues affect the ability of the patient to successfully take those medications. Home care nurses gain important insights into both medication regimen complexity and patient and family perspectives while they are in the patient’s home.  (Sheehan, et al, 2018).

Once, while in the Director of Nursing role, I attended a supervisory joint visit with skilled nurse, the patient was on coumadin, she was well controlled and only having her PT/INR checked monthly at this point, coumadin is automatically flagged a high-risk medication.  The skilled nurse dutifully documented with each previous visit that she discussed and reviewed all the medications with the patient.  I asked the patient to bring me her pill box, so I could check to see if her medications were due to be refilled, running low, etc.  This was just my standard assessment during each visit, when I was in the field nursing role.  The patient brought her bin filled with pill bottles.  I have a standard, “play stupid” role, in which I hold up a bottle and ask the patient:  1) what is this pill?  2)  what does it do for you?  3)  how many do you take?  4) what time of the day do you take it?  5)  what problems can you have if you take this medication?  I would expect, within a few weeks of being on home care service, the patient would be able to correctly identify several of their medications.  This patient was doing well, so I was initially impressed with the skilled nursing progress to goals.  Then, I dug deeper into the bin.  I picked up a total of 6 bottles of coumadin.  The patient had been taking 1 pill from each bottle.  She had gathered all her old bottles and dropped them in the basket and then followed the directions on the bottle.  MY HEART STOPPED!  This was an egregious error with potentially deadly results.  The was an extensive corrective action process immediately initiated.  And ever since, I have been committed, perhaps based out of mild PTSD, to ensuring that medication reconciliation is taken seriously and performed appropriately.  Nurses cannot take the patient’s word as proof that the patient and their caregiver understand their medication regimen.  Nurses must perform an actual assessment not an interview.

References

Kollerup, M. G., Curtis, T., & Schantz Laursen, B. (2018). Visiting nurses’ posthospital medication management in home health care: an ethnographic study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences32(1), 222–232. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1111/scs.12451

Meyer-Massetti, C., Hofstetter, V., Hedinger-Grogg, B., Meier, C. R., & Guglielmo, B. J. (2018). Medication-related problems during transfer from hospital to home care: baseline data from Switzerland. International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy40(6), 1614–1620. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1007/s11096-018-0728-3

Sheehan, O. C., Kharrazi, H., Carl, K. J., Wolff, J. L., Roth, D. L., Gabbard, J., & Boyd, C. M. (2018). HELPING OLDER ADULTS Improve Their Medication Experience (HOME). Home Healthcare Now36(1), 10–19. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1097/nhh.0000000000000632

By Day 6 of Week 1

Respond to at least two of your colleagues* on two different days, asking questions to help clarify the scenario and application of data, or offering additional/alternative ideas for the application of nursing informatics principles.

T…,

            I appreciated reading your post regarding the challenges you face as a home health nurse and the medication reconciliation process. As a nurse in the ER, I can tell you that there are fewer things that frustrate me more than having to add this task to my “to-do” list. Especially when the patient either 1) Has over a million medications that they take, and each with changes to their dosages 2) “Know” what they take, but really have no clue what the dosage is, or even the name of it 3) Have no idea. Most days, we are already running around in the ER trying to put out fires, so when the patient does not help us out with their medication reconciliation, oftentimes we are forced to leave that list incomplete and allow the patient to be admitted before the list is accurate. Thankfully, we do have a pharmacy tech that works certain days of the week to help us out with these issues, but for the most part, we as nurses are the ones that must get it done in a rapid yet accurate fashion. In a study conducted by (Monte et al., 2015) regarding medication reconciliations in the ER, it was estimated that approximately 60% of the reconciliations done during their studies had at least one medication error (did not specify if this was because of the patient giving the wrong info, or healthcare staff) and 40% of the completed reconciliations were attributed to a mistake done by the clinician putting in the information. Obviously, these mistakes can have dire consequences that can impact the patient’s admission and even discharge if they are not corrected.

            Regarding the discharge medication reconciliation, it is crucial that the patient’s information be accurate. The authors (Sharma et al., 2012) point out that most patients that present to the emergency department are often in pain, or distress so it can be extra challenging to gather an accurate medication reconciliation from a poorly written list or a bag of pills that they may or may not be accurate. This is even more of a risk for the patient to be discharged with a faulty medication reconciliation, hence increasing the risk for life threatening medication discrepancies, especially if the patient takes multiple medications (Sharma et al., 2012). Thankfully, nurses like you can help prevent the damage from spiraling out of control when there is a thorough assessment performed, and adequate education for the patient.

            To help with this medication reconciliation fallout, do you have any recommendations? Thankfully, electronic health records can be helpful with obtaining information if the patient has been to the hospital, however, it can also be inaccurate if they not updated. I am wondering if there could be a development of an app that can be used by the patient in real-time, or linked to their pharmacy that can be somehow imported into the EHR in the future? Or for the older populations, creating a medication list template that would be easy for them to fill out, and encouraging the frequent update of it? Perhaps with that information in your field of work, you could help find create a database that can track if these are effective tools for these patients.

            Thanks to your post, I am reminded of the immense significance that accurate medication reconciliations have inpatient outcomes. Although I do always try my best, I will admit that the high-intensity nature of my job makes it difficult to see it as an important task, but it absolutely is.

References

Monte, A. A., Anderson, P., Hoppe, J. A., Weinshilboum, R. M., Vasiliou, V., & Heard, K. J. (2015). Accuracy of Electronic Medical Record Medication Reconciliation in Emergency Department Patients. Computers in Emergency Medicine, 49(1), 78–84. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2014.12.052

Sharma, A. M., Dvorkin, R., Tucker, V., Marguiles, J., Yens, D., & Rosalia, A., Jr. (2012). Medical reconciliation in patients discharged from the emergency department. The Journal of Emergency Medicine, 43(2), 366–373. Retrieved December 1, 2020, from https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2011.05.080

*Note: Throughout this program, your fellow students are referred to as colleagues.

NURS 6051 Discussion: The Application of Data to Problem-Solving

The nursing profession has come a long way from paper-and-pen setting into an era of machinery and computers. The advancement of technology in nursing practice has positively affected the care we provide towards our patients in terms of accessibility and standards. It grants us access to a large amount of information which is essential in delivering high-quality care.

According to Kartal and Yazici in 2017, the quality of care that nursing professionals provide to patients has improved substantially with the use of information and communication technologies. The digital age has undeniably helped me personally to become more effective and efficient in my profession. At present, I am working in a telemetry unit and most of my nursing decisions are influenced by the combination of my existing knowledge and the data presented by the equipment available in our unit. For instance, a patient who comes for Betapace loading for atrial fibrillation requires laboratory screening and continuous monitoring for the entire duration of the treatment. With the software utilized by my facility, it automatically gives me medical orders such as the drug dose and its frequency under a specific protocol to be carried out when a patient comes to our unit. As a professional nurse, my initial action is to assess the patient using the skills I acquired throughout my practice before giving any medication even physician order is also in place. Nurses make a clinical decision based on the information they gather from operating machinery, doing nursing procedures, communicating with other people, and the ability to interpret collected data (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2018). In this situation, I use our medical equipment to further assess the patient such as vital sign machine which gives me information about the blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and temperature of a patient. Another essential equipment that I use for Betapace loading is a continuous heart monitor which allows me to see a bigger picture of the patient’s cardiac rhythm and notify me if the protocol ordered is appropriate for the patient. The protocol also automatically instructs me to check the potassium and magnesium level before the initial dose of the medicine to prevent the patient from having a cardiac arrest or torsade’s de pointes. In situations where the electrolytes are not within the normal range, the computer fires a task whether to replace it with the electrolyte, withhold the medication or to inform the physician for additional advice. According to the information presented, together with my knowledge and skills, I can generate my subsequent nursing steps which guide me to practice safely and ensure patient’s conditions are addressed appropriately.

The use of technology in the nursing profession has improved the quality of care to the patient by setting a standard practice in the healthcare field (Technology in Nursing Today, 2019). Overall, nursing and technology work hand in hand to improve patient experience, promote safe practice and enhance nursing knowledge.

Reference

Kartal, Y. A., & Yazici, S. (2017). Health Technologies and Reflections in Nursing McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2018). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (Fourth). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Practices. International Journal of Caring Sciences10(3), 1733–1740.

Technology in Nursing Today. (2019, August 9). Retrieved from https://thejournalofmhealth.com/technology-in-nursing-today/

I agree that the use of technology in the nursing profession has improved the quality of care we provide for our patients. Although technology is used to help care for the patient, nurses must possess the technical skills to manage equipment and perform procedures, the interpersonal skills to interact appropriately with people, and the cognitive skills to observe, recognize, and collect data; analyze and interpret data; and reach a reasonable conclusion that forms the basis of a decision (McGonigie and Mastrian, 2018). We must make sure the equipment is working properly giving us the correct information so we can provide safe and efficient care for our patients. If we get incorrect information, it could be a matter of life or death for the patient.  Healthcare professionals constantly process data and information to provide the best possible care for their patients (McGonigie and Mastrian, 2018).  The more data that is collected and analyzed, the more accurate the resulting conclusions tend to be, providing the best possible information for determining how best to care for patients in the future (Impact of health informatics, 2018). Even though, technology has helped to improve the quality of care, it will never replace the initial nursing skills acquired in nursing school.

Impact of health informatics on nursing. (2018, October 26). Retrieved from https://healthinformatics.uic.edu/blog/the-impact-of-health-informatics-on-nursing-practice/

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2018). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

I have much admiration for you working in tele! I do work in the ER but cardiac is NOT my favorite!

I have a question for you? Have you had much experience with the Zio patch?

For those who are not familiar with this device, I took this excerpt from an NIH website called Director’s Blog.  “The Zio patch is a 2-by-5-inch adhesive patch, worn much like a bandage, on the upper left side of the chest. It’s water resistant and can be kept on around the clock while a person sleeps, exercises, or takes a shower. The wireless patch continuously monitors heart rhythms, storing EKG data for later analysis.” (“Artificial Intelligence,” 2019, ) After that, you send it to your doctor’s office and they interpret your heart rhythms and rates for the last 48 hours and determine a plan of care.  Can you imagine the technology that takes place every minute of that walking diagnostic exam?

In the article Evolving Role of the Nursing Informatics Specialist, the authors lead to virtual care being the leading advancement in today’s health care delivery system. They point out that nurses are not just caring for patients at the bedside and in the office, but also  providing a support system to their patients using the technology to communicate to providers. (Nagle, Sermeus, Junger, 2017)

Using Artificial Intelligence to Catch Irregular Heartbeats. (2019). Retrieved from https://directorsblog.nih.gov/tag/zio-patch/

  Nagle, L., Sermeus, W., & Junger, A. (2017). Evolving role of the nursing informatics specialist. In J. Murphy, W. Goossen, & P. Weber (Eds.), Forecasting Competencies for Nurses in the Future of Connected Health (212–221). Clifton, VA: IMIA and IOS Press. Retrieved from https://serval.unil.ch/resource/serval:BIB_4A0FEA56B8CB.P001/REF                               

Required Readings

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

  • Chapter 1, “Nursing Science and the Foundation of Knowledge” (pp. 7–19)
  • Chapter 2, “Introduction to Information, Information Science, and Information Systems” (pp. 21–33)
  • Chapter 3, “Computer Science and the Foundation of Knowledge Model” (pp.
  • 35–62)

Nagle, L., Sermeus, W., & Junger, A. (2017).  Evolving Role of the Nursing Infomatics Specialist. In J. Murphy, W. Goosen, &  P. Weber  (Eds.), Forecasting Competencies for Nurses in the Future of Connected Health (212-221). Clifton, VA: IMIA and IOS Press. Retrieved from https://serval.unil.ch/resource/serval:BIB_4A0FEA56B8CB.P001/REF

Sweeney, J. (2017). Healthcare informatics. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 21(1).

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Health Informatics and Population Health: Trends in Population Health [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Credit: Provided courtesy of the Laureate International Network of Universities.

Public Health Informatics Institute. (2017). Public Health Informatics: “translating” knowledge for health [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLUygA8Hpfo

Rubric Detail

Select Grid View or List View to change the rubric’s layout.

Name: NURS_5051_Module01_Week01_Discussion_Rubric
Grid View
List View
Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting
45 (45%) – 50 (50%)
Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

Supported by at least three current, credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.
40 (40%) – 44 (44%)
Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.
35 (35%) – 39 (39%)
Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with two credible sources.

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.
0 (0%) – 34 (34%)
Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately.

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible sources.

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.
Main Post: Timeliness
10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response
17 (17%) – 18 (18%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
15 (15%) – 16 (16%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
13 (13%) – 14 (14%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.
0 (0%) – 12 (12%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Second Response
16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
12 (12%) – 13 (13%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.
0 (0%) – 11 (11%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Participation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100
Name: NURS_5051_Module01_Week01_Discussion_Rubric


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