NURS 6051 Discussion: Healthcare Information Technology Trends

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NURS 6051 Discussion: Healthcare Information Technology Trends

Throughout history, technological advancements have appeared for one purpose before finding applications elsewhere that lead to spikes in its usage and development. The internet, for example, was originally developed to share research before becoming a staple of work and entertainment. But technology—new and repurposed—will undoubtedly continue to be a driver of healthcare information. Informaticists often stay tuned to trends to monitor what the next new technology will be or how the next new idea for applying existing technology can benefit outcomes.

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In this Discussion, you will reflect on your healthcare organization’s use of technology and offer a technology trend you observe in your environment.

To Prepare:

Reflect on the Resources related to digital information tools and technologies.

Consider your healthcare organization’s use of healthcare technologies to manage and distribute information.

Reflect on current and potential future trends, such as use of social media and mobile applications/telehealth, Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled asset tracking, or expert systems/artificial intelligence, and how they may impact nursing practice and healthcare delivery.

By Day 3 of Week 6

Post a brief description of general healthcare technology trends, particularly related to data/information you have observed in use in your healthcare organization or nursing practice. Describe any potential challenges or risks that may be inherent in the technologies associated with these trends you described. Then, describe at least one potential benefit and one potential risk associated with data safety, legislation, and patient care for the technologies you described. Next, explain which healthcare technology trends you believe are most promising for impacting healthcare technology in nursing practice and explain why. Describe whether this promise will contribute to improvements in patient care outcomes, efficiencies, or data management. Be specific and provide examples.

By Day 6 of Week 6

Respond to at least two of your colleagues* on two different days, offering additional/alternative ideas regarding opportunities and risks related to the observations shared.

*Note: Throughout this program, your fellow students are referred to as colleagues.

Module 4: Technologies Supporting Applied Practice and Optimal Patient Outcomes (Weeks 6-8)

 

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Informatics Tools and Technologies [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Learning Objectives

Students will:
  • Evaluate healthcare technology trends for data and information in nursing practice and healthcare delivery
  • Analyze challenges and risks inherent in healthcare technology
  • Analyze healthcare technology benefits and risks for data safety, legislation, and patient care
  • Evaluate healthcare technology impact on patient outcomes, efficiencies, and data management
  • Analyze research on the application of clinical systems to improve outcomes and efficiencies
Due By Assignment
Week 6, Days 1–2 Read/Watch/Listen to the Learning Resources.
Compose your initial Discussion post.
Week 6, Day 3 Post your initial Discussion post.
Begin to compose your Assignment.
Week 6, Days 4-5 Review peer Discussion posts.
Compose your peer Discussion responses.
Continue to compose your Assignment.
Week 6, Day 6 Post at least two peer Discussion responses on two different days (and not the same day as the initial post).
Week 6, Day 7 Wrap up Discussion.
Week 7, Days 1-7 Continue to compose your Assignment.
Week 8, Days 1-6 Continue to compose your Assignment.
Week 8, Day 7 Deadline to submit your Assignment.

Photo Credit: Westend61


Learning Resources

Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.

Required Readings

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

  • Chapter 14, “The Electronic Health Record and Clinical Informatics” (pp. 267–287)
  • Chapter 15, “Informatics Tools to Promote Patient Safety and Quality Outcomes” (pp. 293–317)
  • Chapter 16, “Patient Engagement and Connected Health” (pp. 323–338)
  • Chapter 17, “Using Informatics to Promote Community/Population Health” (pp. 341–355)
  • Chapter 18, “Telenursing and Remote Access Telehealth” (pp. 359–388)

Dykes, P. C., Rozenblum, R., Dalal, A., Massaro, A., Chang, F., Clements, M., Collins, S. …Bates, D. W. (2017). Prospective evaluation of a multifaceted intervention to improve outcomes in intensive care: The Promoting Respect and Ongoing Safety Through Patient Engagement Communication and Technology Study. Critical Care Medicine, 45(8), e806–e813. doi:10.1097/CCM.0000000000002449

HealthIT.gov. (2018c). What is an electronic health record (EHR)? Retrieved from https://www.healthit.gov/faq/what-electronic-health-record-ehr

Rao-Gupta, S., Kruger, D. Leak, L. D., Tieman, L. A., & Manworren, R. C. B. (2018). Leveraging interactive patient care technology to Improve pain management engagement. Pain Management Nursing, 19(3), 212–221. doi:10.1016/j.pmn.2017.11.002

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Skiba, D. (2017). Evaluation tools to appraise social media and mobile applications. Informatics, 4(3), 32–40. doi:10.3390/informatics4030032

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Public Health Informatics [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

 

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Electronic Records and Managing IT Change [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

 

Submission and Grading Information

Rubric Detail

Select Grid View or List View to change the rubric’s layout.

Name: NURS_5051_Module04_Week06_Discussion_Rubric
Grid View
List View
Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting
45 (45%) – 50 (50%)
Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

Supported by at least three current, credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.
40 (40%) – 44 (44%)
Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.
35 (35%) – 39 (39%)
Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with two credible sources.

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.
0 (0%) – 34 (34%)
Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately.

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible sources.

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.
Main Post: Timeliness
10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response
17 (17%) – 18 (18%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
15 (15%) – 16 (16%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
13 (13%) – 14 (14%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.
0 (0%) – 12 (12%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Second Response
16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
12 (12%) – 13 (13%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.
0 (0%) – 11 (11%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Participation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100
Name: NURS_5051_Module04_Week06_Discussion_Rubric

Over the past month increasing use of telehealth devices are trending due to the current pandemic of COVID-19. McGonigle and Mastrian (2017) describe telehealth as a “wide range of health services that are delivered by telecommunications-ready tools, such as the telephone, videophone, and computer” (p. 359). These telecommunication tools allow the providers to access the patients’ electronic health records (EHRs). EHRs are highly valuable because they generate patient health information from multiple encounters in any care setting including patient demographics, notes, problems, medications, medical history, immunizations, laboratory data, vital signs, and radiology reports (Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society, 2018). The hospital that I am working in is currently using telehealth tablets for providers to round on confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients. The use of telehealth has surged at this time in efforts to prevent exposure to doctors. This new current technology trend can be beneficial by decreasing exposure and hopes of flattening the curve, however, nurses must still go into patient’s rooms for patient care. Overuse of telehealth visits may have the risk of decreasing morale in nursing staff. Some nurses feel less valuable if doctors do not have to enter these rooms, but the nurses must. Resentments may build between nursing staff and physicians. Currently, our hospital does not have the technology to auscultate via telecommunications, therefore, physicians must rely solely on nursing assessments.

Thankfully, new legislation has passed allowing healthcare services to bill Medicare fee-for-service for patient care delivered by telehealth during the current emergency (Moore, 2020). The use of telehealth technology is very promising for flattening the curve in the spread of COVID-19. If less frontline healthcare workers are exposed, then there are more workers to care for the sick and less spread of the virus. Overall patient care outcomes should improve.

References

Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society. (2018). Electronic health records.  Retrieved from https://www.himss.org/library/ehr/

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge  (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Moore, K. (2020, March 10).  Coronavirus (COVID-19): new telehealth rules and procedure        codes for testing [Blog post]. Retrieved from            https://www.aafp.org/journals/fpm/blogs/gettingpaid/entry/coronavirus_testing_telehealt   .html

Good Afternoon Oyebisi

I really enjoyed reading your post and your discussion of Voalte application for smartphones.  Johnson & Johnson Nursing (2016) discussed the increasing use of mobile apps by nurses. They noted, “Some healthcare organizations today provide nurses with apps to use on hospital-issued mobile devices to help easily document, retrieve and communicate patient information at the point-of-care. With the advancement of mobile app software and devices, nurses can instantaneously record information on a mobile app as they are checking vitals or assess patients, which help minimize documentation errors.  Some advanced mobile apps even have speech recognition-based capabilities for hands-free patient information recording into the electronic health records (EHR) system. It’s as easy as speaking directly to your smartphone app and confirming the recorded input.

According to Jason J. Fratzke, RN, MSN, chief nursing informatics officer for Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., the standardized use of mobile apps in healthcare facilities is in the early stages of implementation. Today, in many healthcare facilities, nurses write their patient assessments on generic fill-in-the-blank pieces of paper to record information about their patients, otherwise known as “brain sheets”.  Then, later in the day when a short window of time is available, they sit down at a desktop computer to plug all the patient information into the system. Fratzke notes that this can have significant implications for the care of the patient such as a delay in the documentation of discrete patient data that can lengthen the time that it takes for nurses to receive  early warning signs of patient deterioration or other notifications.

Fratzke is a leader in nursing informatics and specializes in developing and configuring mobile app technology for nurses. Four years ago, Fratzke began developing  and prototyping an internal  mobile nursing app, a native iOS app called “Infuze,” which uses an icon system (color, shape, blinking, etc.) with specific meaning for each icon that can communicate clinical and operational information to the user. The icon system allows nurses to access specific operational and patient clinical data easily and quickly on smartphones, tablets and/or computer monitor screens, many of which can be easily used at the bedside.

For the past year, Fratzke has been working to adapt a similar existing mobile app called “Epic Rover” with more advanced capabilities for nurses at Mayo Clinic. This app will be launched in conjunction with the staggered go-live schedule for Epic across all Mayo Clinic sites, beginning in mid-2017.  Epic Rover will help nurses record real-time patient assessment documentation more quickly and efficiently. Mayo Clinic will provide nurses with smartphones for work in order to use the “Epic Rover” app. Already, Fratzke has received positive feedback from nurses who have tested the app and applaud the convenience and time-saving features.“The app can be downloaded on smartphones or tablets,” said Fratzke. “It has features to not only document patient care information but can also wirelessly scan and perform barcode medication administration, provide communication via secure messaging and deliver real-time notifications of essential patient information. These features provide more organization, proficiency and heightened communication between nurses and other healthcare providers, ultimately improving patient safety”.

I thought you may be interested in an article by Oh and his colleagues (2017). They  conducted a systematic review on nurses use of smartphones to improve patient care. They concluded, “Evidence to support nurses’ use of smartphones within clinical practice was enhanced communication, ease of access to clinical information, and improved time management. Evidence against using smartphones include a potential source of distraction and displaying unprofessional appearance. Furthermore, we believe there are unmeasured risks of smartphones being vectors of nosocomial infection as well as being a cause of a potential breach of confidentiality. However, when appropriate strategies are implemented to mitigate these risks, we believe that the potential benefits of using smartphones can easily outweigh the risks associated with using these devices.

Nurses experienced improved communication when they used smartphones to communicate with others compared to using traditional methods of communication, such as pagers and landline phones. The improved communication was as a result of nurses having a more efficient tool for communication, being able to communicate with others quickly, and having to deal with fewer interruptions and delays associated with other methods of communications. By allowing nurses to engage in a two-way communication using smartphones, nurses can communicate with other HCPs quickly, use their smartphones to communicate with others at any location in the unit, and easily access important contact information such as the patient’s physician via the contact list on the phone [5,6,7]. Similarly, a direct two-way communication between the nurse and the patient allows greater depth of information to be shared between them, such as the reason for requesting assistance as well the level of urgency. This may, in turn, allow the nurses to prioritize their tasks better and can help reduce the occurrence or the severity of an adverse event such as falls [15].

Using smartphones as a tool to obtain clinical information at the point of care not only provides direct and instantaneous access to information but that this may also help reduce the barrier for nurses to seek pertinent clinical information as they need it. The reason for reduced barrier is because that when many bedside nurses require certain information, they would in most cases be required to physically find materials such as a computer or a book to access the information. As such, for many nurses with time constraint due to heavy workload, having a hand-held device to which they can access information instantly on the spot could be a critical determining factor as to whether or not they can integrate relevant clinical information, such as medications, into their care [19]. This can potentially impact patient safety, and outcome as nurses can make a better-informed decision during their care. Furthermore, nurses can also use other features of smartphones such as a calculator, a notepad, and task-reminder functions to assist them in their day to day care of their patients. Thus, we believe that many of these features that are available on smartphones would have an additive effect in not only aiding the nurse in carrying out their day to day tasks but saving time and also promoting patient safety. Other prospective usages of smartphones may include using smartphones and their accessories as a tool to visually document the progression of wound healing as well on the spot electronic documentation of any pertinent nursing actions such as medication administration [21,22]. We believe this would be conducive to reducing medication errors as bed-side nurses would have the information at their point of care to verify the medication orders rather than simply relying on memories, which may be susceptible to errors from distractions they face during their care”.

“Based on our systematic review, smartphones can assist nurses in their day to day care. However, there is a lack of research on direct measures of patient outcomes from nurses’ smartphone use including, but not limited to, the number of adverse events (e.g. falls, medication errors), the effectiveness of patient education and overall patient satisfaction. Further research may be needed on this to help clarify if smartphone use may significant benefit patients. However, if nurses are able to manage their time as well as better coordinate their day to day tasks using smartphones, this can also benefit patients”.

Both of the articles speak to the benefits of smartphone use for patients and nurses. I do agree with Oh et al.’s point that we do need to attend to processed to make sure smartphones are disinfected on a regular basis. Smartphones are beginning to replace computer workstations. I think this is a trend that will increase in the near future. Thanks for sharing your thoughts and experiences. Dr. Reilly

Johnson & Johnson Nursing (2016, April 13). Mobile Apps Help Boost Efficiency for Nurseshttps://nursing.jnj.com/getting-real-nursing-today/mobile-apps-help-boost-efficiency-for-nurses.

Oh, Y. S., Yeon, J. J., Ens, T. A., & Mannion, C. A. (2017). A Review of the Effect of Nurses’ Use of Smartphone to Improve Patient Care. Journal of Undergraduate Research in Alberta, 6, 32-39.

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