NURS 6051 Assignment The Impact of Nursing Informatics on Patient Outcomes and Patient Care Efficiencies

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NURS 6051 Assignment: The Impact of Nursing Informatics on Patient Outcomes and Patient Care Efficiencies

NURS 6051 Assignment The Impact of Nursing Informatics on Patient Outcomes and Patient Care Efficiencies

Assignment: The Impact of Nursing Informatics on Patient Outcomes and Patient Care Efficiencies

In the Discussion for this module, you considered the interaction of nurse informaticists with other specialists to ensure successful care. How is that success determined?

Patient outcomes and the fulfillment of care goals is one of the major ways that healthcare success is measured. Measuring patient outcomes results in the generation of data that can be used to improve results. Nursing informatics can have a significant part in this process and can help to improve outcomes by improving processes, identifying at-risk patients, and enhancing efficiency.

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To Prepare:

Review the concepts of technology application as presented in the Resources.

Reflect on how emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence may help fortify nursing informatics as a specialty by leading to increased impact on patient outcomes or patient care efficiencies.

The Assignment: (4-5 pages)

In a 4- to 5-page project proposal written to the leadership of your healthcare organization, propose a nursing informatics project for your organization that you advocate to improve patient outcomes or patient-care efficiency. Your project proposal should include the following:

Describe the project you propose.

Identify the stakeholders impacted by this project.

Explain the patient outcome(s) or patient-care efficiencies this project is aimed at improving and explain how this improvement would occur. Be specific and provide examples.

Identify the technologies required to implement this project and explain why.

Identify the project team (by roles) and explain how you would incorporate the nurse informaticist in the project team. NURS 6051 Assignment The Impact of Nursing Informatics on Patient Outcomes and Patient Care Efficiencies

By Day 7 of Week 3

Submit your completed Project Proposal.

Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:

Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK3Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.

Click the Week 3 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.

Click the Week 3 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.

Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK3Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.

If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.

Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.

Due to the nature of this assignment, your instructor may require more than 5 days to provide you with quality feedback.

Module 2: The Role of the Informatics Specialist in Healthcare (Week 3)

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Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). The Nurse Informaticist [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Learning Objectives
Students will:
Analyze interactions between nurse informaticists, data/technology specialists, and other professionals in healthcare organizations
Recommend strategies to improve interactions between nurse informaticists and other professionals
Analyze how nursing informatics as a specialty and new technologies impact interactions between nurse informaticists and members of healthcare teams
Recommend nursing informatics projects to improve outcomes or efficiencies in healthcare organizations
Identify stakeholders impacted by nursing informatics projects
Analyze how nursing informatics projects improve outcomes or efficiencies in healthcare organizations
Identify technologies required for implementation of nursing informatics projects
Analyze the role of the nurse informaticist in nursing informatics project teams
Due By
Assignment
Week 3, Days 1–2
Read/Watch/Listen to the Learning Resources.
Compose your initial Discussion post.
Week 3, Day 3
Post your initial Discussion post.
Begin to compose your Assignment.
Week 3, Days 4-5
Review peer Discussion posts.
Compose your peer Discussion responses.
Continue to compose your Assignment.
Week 3, Day 6
Post at least two peer Discussion responses on two different days (and not the same day as the initial post).
Week 3, Day 7
Wrap up Discussion.
Deadline to submit your Assignment.
Photo Credit: [Ariel Skelley]/[Blend Images]/Getty Images

Learning Resources
Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.
Required Readings
McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Chapter 25, “The Art of Caring in Technology-Laden Environments” (pp. 525–535)
Chapter 26, “Nursing Informatics and the Foundation of Knowledge” (pp. 537–551)
American Nurses Association. (2018). Inclusion of recognized terminologies supporting nursing practice within electronic health records and other health information technology solutions. Retrieved from https://www.nursingworld.org/practice-policy/nursing-excellence/official-position-statements/id/Inclusion-of-Recognized-Terminologies-Supporting-Nursing-Practice-within-Electronic-Health-Records/
Glassman, K. S. (2017). Using data in nursing practice. American Nurse Today, 12(11), 45–47. Retrieved from https://www.americannursetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ant11-Data-1030.pdf
Macieria, T. G. R., Smith, M. B., Davis, N., Yao, Y., Wilkie, D. J., Lopez, K. D., & Keenan, G. (2017). Evidence of progress in making nursing practice visible using standardized nursing data: A systematic review. AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, 2017, 1205–1214. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5977718/
Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. (2017). Standard nursing terminologies: A landscape analysis. Retrieved from https://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/snt_final_05302017.pdf
Rutherford, M. A. (2008). Standardized nursing language: What does it mean for nursing practice? Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 13(1), 1–12. doi:10.3912/OJIN.Vol13No01PPT05.

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.
Thew, J. (2016, April 19). Big data means big potential, challenges for nurse execs. Retrieved from https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs
Wang, Y. Kung, L., & Byrd, T. A. (2018). Big data analytics: Understanding its capabilities and potential benefits for healthcare organizations. Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 126(1), 3–13. doi:10.1016/j.techfore.2015.12.019.

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.
Required Media
Laureate Education (Executive Producer). (2012). Data, information, knowledge and wisdom continuum [Multimedia file]. Baltimore, MD: Author. Retrieved from http://mym.cdn.laureate-media.com/2dett4d/Walden/NURS/6051/03/mm/continuum/index.html
Public Health Informatics Institute. (2017). Public Health Informatics: “shipping” information for better health [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1gNQ9dm0zg.

Public Health Informatics Institute. (2017). Public Health Informatics: knowledge “architecture” [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sofmUeQkMLU.

Name: NURS_5051_Module02_Week03_Assignment_Rubric
Grid View
List View
Excellent Good Fair Poor
In a 4- to 5-page project proposal written to the leadership of your healthcare organization, propose a nursing informatics project for your organization that you advocate to improve patient outcomes or patient care efficiency. Your project proposal should include the following:

· Describe the project you propose.

· Identify the stakeholders impacted by this project.

· Explain the patient outcome(s) or patient-care efficiencies this project is aimed at improving, and explain how this improvement would occur. Be specific and provide examples.

· Identify the technologies required to implement this project and explain why.

· Identify the project team (by roles) and explain how you would incorporate the nurse informaticist in the project team.
77 (77%) – 85 (85%)
The response accurately and thoroughly describes in detail the project proposed.

The response accurately and clearly identifies the stakeholders impacted by the project proposed.

The response accurately and thoroughly explains in detail the patient outcome(s) or patient-care efficiencies that the project proposed is aimed at improving, including an accurate and detailed explanation, with sufficient supporting evidence of how this improvement would occur.

The response accurately and clearly identifies the technologies required to implement the project proposed with a detailed explanation why.

The response accurately and clearly identifies the project team (by roles) and thoroughly explains in detail how to incorporate the nurse informaticist in the project team.

Includes: 3 or more peer-reviewed sources and 2 or more course resources.
68 (68%) – 76 (76%)
The response describes the project proposed.

The response identifies the stakeholders impacted by the project proposed.

The response explains the patient outcome(s) or patient-care efficiencies that the project proposed is aimed at improving, including an explanation, with some supporting evidence of how this improvement would occur.

The response identifies the technologies required to implement the project proposed with an explanation why.

The response identifies the project team (by roles) and explains how to incorporate the nurse informaticist in the project team.

Includes: 2 peer-reviewed sources and 2 course resources.
60 (60%) – 67 (67%)
The response describing the project proposed is vague or inaccurate.

The response identifying the stakeholders impacted by the project proposed is vague or inaccurate.

The response explaining the patient outcome(s) or patient-care efficiencies the project proposed is aimed at improving, including an explanation of how this improvement would occur, is vague or inaccurate, or includes little to no supporting evidence.

The response identifying the technologies required to implement the project proposed with an explanation why is vague or inaccurate.

The response identifying the project team (by roles) and an explanation of how to incorporate the nurse informaticist in the project team is vague or inaccurate.

Includes: 1 peer-reviewed sources and 1 course resources.
0 (0%) – 59 (59%)
The response describing the project proposed is vague and inaccurate, or is missing.

The response identifying the stakeholders impacted by the project proposed is vague and inaccurate, or is missing.

The response explaining the patient outcome(s) or patient-care efficiencies the project proposed is aimed at improving, including an explanation of how this improvement would occur, is vague and inaccurate, includes no supporting evidence, or is missing.

The response identifying the technologies required to implement the project proposed with an explanation why is vague and inaccurate, or is missing.

The response identifying the project team (by roles) and an explanation of how to incorporate the nurse informaticist in the project team is vague and inaccurate, or is missing.

Includes: 1 or fewer resources.
Written Expression and Formatting – Paragraph Development and Organization:

Paragraphs make clear points that support well developed ideas, flow logically, and demonstrate continuity of ideas. Sentences are carefully focused–neither long and rambling nor short and lacking substance.
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 80% of the time.
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity 60%- 79% of the time.
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Paragraphs and sentences follow writing standards for flow, continuity, and clarity < 60% of the time.
Written Expression and Formatting – English writing standards:

Correct grammar, mechanics, and proper punctuation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Uses correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation with no errors.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Contains a few (1-2) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Contains several (3-4) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Contains many (≥ 5) grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors that interfere with the reader’s understanding.
Written Expression and Formatting – The paper follows correct APA format for title page, headings, font, spacing, margins, indentations, page numbers, running head, parenthetical/in-text citations, and reference list.
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Uses correct APA format with no errors.
4 (4%) – 4 (4%)
Contains a few (1-2) APA format errors.
3.5 (3.5%) – 3.5 (3.5%)
Contains several (3-4) APA format errors.
0 (0%) – 3 (3%)
Contains many (≥ 5) APA format errors.
Total Points: 100
Name: NURS_5051_Module02_Week03_Assignment_Rubric

BIG DATA MEANS BIG POTENTIAL, CHALLENGES FOR NURSE EXECS

ANALYSIS  |  BY JENNIFER THEW RN     APRIL 19, 2016

To ensure big data is used to influence outcomes that are meaningful to the nursing profession, nurse executives need to act as data visionaries and architects.

Have you ever found yourself poring over stacks of data, feeling more like a statistician than a nurse? If you have, welcome to the world of big data.

 

“You have all of these different data sources coming at you on a weekly, monthly, quarterly basis. The CFO has a stack of data for you, your productivity-management engineer people have a stack of data for you, HR has a stack of data for you, and then your quality director, your clinical folks, have a stack of data for you,” says Jane Englebright, RN, PhD, CEBP, FAAN, chief nursing executive and senior vice president at Nashville, Tennessee-based HCA.

 

 

“And your job is to sort through all that data and synthesize it in some way and come up with brilliant conclusions about how to run the organization.”

 

Big data “typically refers to a large complex data set that yields substantially more information when analyzed as a fully integrated data set as compared to the outputs achieved with smaller sets of the same data that are not integrated,” according to the Online Journal of Nursing Informatics.

 

 


GET THE LATEST ON HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP IN YOUR INBOX.

 

Dealing with big data can understandably be challenging for chief nurse executives.

 

During a session titled, “The CNE Role in the Big Data Revolution,” at the American Organization of Nurse Executives last month in Fort Worth, TX, Englebright and healthcare management consultant Barbara Caspers, RN, MS, PHN, discussed importance of shared strategies to help CNEs ready their organizations for the “big data revolution.”

 

 

Drowning in Data

 

When a CNE is analyzing and synthesizing data, it’s typically done manually and is a very time- and labor- intensive process, in part, because technology systems have traditionally been built in silos. “Often they don’t even call the units the same thing. They don’t name them the same thing. They don’t necessarily define them the same way,” Englebright says.

 

For example, the definition of a day may vary from system to system and the way a month is calculated in the finance systems may differ from how it is calculated in the payroll system.

 

Trying to “figure out how to keep up with your agency hours and what the cost of your agency is in the finance system versus the scheduling system,” Englebright says, is “just a nightmare, trying to make all of these different things sync.”

 

The lack of data standardization can also make it challenging for a CNE to assess how the organization or a particular unit is performing and to make well-informed decisions about what to change. Having good data is key to making effective changes.

 

“For those of us who grew-up studying the biological sciences, we understand that we have taken a very linear, Newtonian-approach to data over something that’s really much more like a biological system,” she explains. “When you perturb one part of our system… it has ripple effects throughout the entire organization.”

 

Failure to recognize how this data interacts throughout the system has been a limitation in the types of data analytics that have been put forth.

 

“The frustration that we often have as nurse leaders in looking at this data, is [that] some of the variables we care about the most, aren’t even in the data,” Englebright says. “We don’t have something that measures nursing competence, for example. We don’t have something that measures how committed the nurses are. We don’t have something that measures if the patient really [is] going to do the stuff we just invested all this time in teaching them to do.”

 

Because of this, CNEs end up having to advocate for the things they care about in a person-on-person debate, than being able to make a persuasive business case based on data, she says.

 

 

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