NRNP 6635 The history of the Diagnosis of Mental Disorders

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NRNP 6635 The history of the Diagnosis of Mental Disorders

NRNP 6635 The history of the Diagnosis of Mental Disorders

https://nursingpaperacers.com/nrnp-6635-the-history-of-the-diagnosis-of-mental-disorders/

The history of the diagnosis of mental disorders is fraught with examples of how cultural norms and
prejudices interfere with and warp a diagnosis. The result is that normal behavior and orientations have
been pathologized as an illness or disease. An example of this would be the story of Alan Turing, the
famous British computer scientist of the 20th century, who was instrumental in inventing modern
computers and deciphering German code in World War II. He was convicted in 1952 in England of gross
indecency for being gay. Turing was forced by the courts to undergo 12 months of hormone therapy and
could no longer work for the British government. At the time, homosexuality was pathologized as a
mental disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and was criminalized in
most Western countries. It was not until 1973 that the American Psychiatric Association (APA) finally
removed homosexuality from the DSM.
Historically, the process of rendering a diagnosis has been used to pathologize those who fell outside
what was considered the cultural norm of human behavior. This process often marginalized diagnosed
populations and prevented individuals from receiving appropriate care. It is of utmost importance to
consider cultural issues that influence how you as a clinician interpret a client’s behavior and how
cultural issues influence how a client may express behavior. This week, you explore the history of
psychopathology and the evolution of theoretical perspectives in the field.

NRNP 6635 The history of the Diagnosis of Mental Disorders

Learning Objective
Students will:
  Analyze historical and currently recognized biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors
that inform the expression, course, and prevalence of psychopathology

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 1, Neural Sciences
 Chapter 2, Contributions of the Psychosocial Sciences
 Chapter 3, Contributions of the Sociocultural Sciences
 Chapter 4, Theories of Personality and Psychopathology
 Chapter 31.17c, Child Psychiatry: Other Conditions: Identity Problem

Butcher, J. N., & Kendall, P. C. (2018). Introduction to childhood and adolescent psychopathology. In J. N.
Butcher & P. C. Kendall (Eds.), APA handbook of psychopathology: Child and adolescent
psychopathology., Vol. 2. (pp. 3–14). American Psychological Association. https://doi-
org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/0000065-001

Cheung, F. M., & Mak, W. W. S. (2018). Sociocultural factors in psychopathology. In J. N. Butcher & J. M.
Hooley (Eds.), APA handbook of psychopathology: Psychopathology: Understanding, assessing, and
treating adult mental disorders., Vol. 1. (pp. 127–147). American Psychological Association. https://doi-
org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/0000064-006

Jackson, C. E., & Milberg, W. P. (2018). Examination of neurological and neuropsychological features in
psychopathology. In J. N. Butcher & J. M. Hooley (Eds.), APA handbook of psychopathology:
Psychopathology: Understanding, assessing, and treating adult mental disorders., Vol. 1. (pp. 65–90).
American Psychological Association. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/0000064-004

Masten, A. S., & Kalstabakken, A. W. (2018). Developmental perspectives on psychopathology in
children and adolescents. In J. N. Butcher & P. C. Kendall (Eds.), APA handbook of psychopathology: Child
and adolescent psychopathology., Vol. 2. (pp. 15–36). American Psychological Association. https://doi-
org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1037/0000065-002

Document: NRNP 6635 Mid-term Study Guide

Assignment
Practicum Manual Acknowledgment
The Practicum Manual describes the structure and timing of the classroom-based and practicum
experiences and the policies students must follow to be successful in the nurse practitioner (NP)
specialties.
 Field Experience: MSN Nurse Practitioner Practicum Manual

Click here and follow the instructions to confirm you have downloaded and read the entire MSN Nurse
Practitioner Practicum Manual and will abide by the requirements described in order to successfully
complete this program.

Optional Discussion Forum: PMHNP Study Support Lounge
The PMHNP Study Support Lounge is offered throughout the course as a place of academic refuge,
where you can ask questions, offer insights, and interact with your peers. Your Instructor may also
weigh in to provide global feedback to the group based on trends, common problems, and common
strengths in student posts.
As a peer, you are encouraged to provide constructive, helpful feedback to your peers. Advanced
practice nurses always benefit from the feedback of others. Your Study Support Lounge posts may be
procedural (“How do I attach a Kaltura video to a Discussion post?”), conceptual (“How does this relate
to the other therapy approaches we have studied?”), or analytical (“What do these diagnostic results
actually mean in the context of this specific patient case?”). Although not mandatory, this is an
opportunity to interact and study together as you navigate the assignments, so you are highly
encouraged to take part in this activity. Full participation in activities like these is a statistically
significant predictor of success.

To Participate in this Optional Discussion:
PMHNP Study Support Lounge

Discussion: Factors That Influence the Development of Psychopathology

Photo Credit: Getty Images/Blend Images
In many realms of medicine, objective diagnoses can be made: A clavicula is broken.  An infection is
present. TSH levels meet the diagnostic criteria for hypothyroidism. Psychiatry, on the other hand, deals
with psychological phenomena and behaviors. Can these, too, be “defined objectively and by scientific
criteria (Gergen, 1985), or are they social constructions?” (Sadock et al., 2015).
Thanks to myriad advances during recent decades, we know that psychopathology is caused by many
interacting factors. Theoretical and clinical contributions to the field have come from the neural
sciences, genetics, psychology, and social-cultural sciences. How do these factors impact the expression,
classification, diagnosis, and prevalence of psychopathology, and why might it be important for a nurse
practitioner to take a multidimensional, integrative approach?

To Prepare:
 Review this week’s Learning Resources, considering the many interacting factors that contribute
to the development of psychopathology.
 Consider how theoretical perspective on psychopathology impacts the work of the PMHNP.
By Day 3 of Week 1
Explain the biological (genetic and neuroscientific); psychological (behavioral and cognitive processes,
emotional, developmental); and social, cultural, and interpersonal factors that influence the
development of psychopathology.
Read a selection of your colleagues’ responses
By Day 6 of Week 1
Respond to at least two of your colleagues on 2 different days by explaining the implications of why, as
an advanced practice nurse, it is important to adopt a multidimensional, integrative model of
psychopathology.
Note: For this Discussion, you are required to complete your initial post before you will be able to view
and respond to your colleagues’ postings. Begin by clicking on the "Post to Discussion Question" link, and
then select "Create Thread" to complete your initial post. Remember, once you click on Submit, you
cannot delete or edit your own posts, and you cannot post anonymously. Please check your post carefully
before clicking on Submit!
Submission and Grading Information
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:
Week 1 Discussion Rubric

Post by Day 3 of Week 1 and Respond by Day 6 of Week 1

To Participate in this Discussion:
Week 1 Discussion

What's Coming Up in Week 2?

In Week 2, you will be introduced to assessment and diagnosis of the psychiatric patient. You will
explore elements of the psychiatric interview, history, and examination as well as psychiatric rating
scales. You also will review the classification system of psychiatric disorders in the DSM-5 and the role
the DSM-5 plays in diagnosis.

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
Practicum – Upcoming Deadline
In the Nurse Practitioner programs of study (FNP, AGACNP, AGPCNP, and PMHNP) you are required to
take several practicum courses. If you plan on taking a practicum course within the next two terms, you
will need to submit your application via  Meditrek  .
For information on the practicum application process and deadlines, please visit the Field Experience:
College of Nursing: Application Process – Graduate web page.
Please take the time to review the Appropriate Preceptors and Field Sites for your courses.
Please take the time to review the practicum manuals, FAQs, Webinars and any required forms on
the Field Experience: College of Nursing: Student Resources and Manuals web page.
 Field Experience: College of Nursing Quick Answers
 Field Experience: MSN Nurse Practitioner Practicum Manual
 Student Practicum Resources: NP Student Orientation
Next Week

To go to the next week:
Week 2

Week 2: Assessment and Diagnosis of the Psychiatric Patient
A sensitively crafted intake assessment can be a powerful therapeutic tool. It can establish rapport
between patient and therapist, further the therapeutic alliance, alleviate anxiety, provide reassurance,
and facilitate the flow of information necessary for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment
plan.
—Pamela Bjorklund, clinical psychologist
Whether you are treating patients for physical ailments or clients for mental health issues, the
assessment process is an inextricable part of health care. To properly diagnose clients and develop
treatment plans, you must have a strong foundation in assessment. This includes a working knowledge
of assessments that are available to aid in diagnosis, how to use these assessments, and how to select
the most appropriate assessment based on a client’s presentation.
This week, as you explore assessment and diagnosis of patients in mental health settings, you examine
assessment tools, including their psychometric properties and appropriate uses. You also familiarize
yourself with the DSM-5 classification system.
Reference: Bjorklund, P. (2013). Assessment and diagnosis. In K. Wheeler (Ed.), Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice (2nd ed.) (pp. 95–168).
Springer Publishing Company.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
  Evaluate elements of the psychiatric interview, history, and examination
  Analyze psychometric properties of psychiatric rating scales
 Justify appropriate use of psychiatric rating scales in advanced practice nursing

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American  Psychiatric Association. (2013). Section I: DSM-5 basics. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of
mental disorders (5th ed., pp. 5–29). Author.

Carlat, D. J. (2017). The psychiatric interview (4th ed.). Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 34, Writing Up the Results of the Interview

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 5, Examination and Diagnosis of the Psychiatric Patient
 Chapter 6, Classification in Psychiatry
 Chapter 31, Child Psychiatry (Sections 31.1 and 31.2 only)

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (1995). Practice parameters for the assessment
and treatment of children and adolescents.
https://www.aacap.org/App_Themes/AACAP/docs/practice_parameters/psychiatric_assessment_practi
ce_parameter.pdf

American Psychiatric Association. (2016). Practice guidelines for the psychiatric evaluation of adults (3rd
ed.). https://psychiatryonline.org/doi/pdf/10.1176/appi.books.9780890426760

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2017). Classification in psychiatry. In Kaplan and Sadock’s Concise
Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry (4th ed., pp. 1–8). Wolters Kluwer.

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2017). Psychiatric interview, history, and mental status
examination. In Kaplan and Sadock’s Concise Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry (4th ed., pp. 9–15). Wolters
Kluwer.

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2017). Medical assessment and laboratory testing in psychiatry. In
Kaplan and Sadock’s Concise Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry (4th ed., pp. 16–21). Wolters Kluwer.

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Diagnostic criteria [Video]. Walden University.

MedEasy. (2017). Psychiatric history taking and the mental status examination | USMLE &
COMLEX [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5KwDgWX8L8

Psychiatry Lectures. (2015). Psychiatry lecture: How to do a psychiatric assessment [Video]. YouTube.

Getting Started With the DSM-5
If you were to give a box of 100 different photographs to 10 people and ask them to sort them into
groups, it is very unlikely that all 10 people would sort them into the exact same groups. However, if you
were to give them a series of questions or a classification system to use, the chances that all 10 people
sort them exactly the same increases depending on the specificity of the system and the knowledge of
those sorting the photographs.

Photo Credit: [Peter Polak]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
This is not unlike what has occurred in the process of classifying mental disorders. A system that
provides enough specificity to appropriately classify a large variety of mental disorders while also
attempting to include all of the possible symptoms, many of which can change over time, is a daunting
task when used by a variety of specialists, doctors, and other professionals with varied experience,
cultures, expertise, and beliefs. The DSM has undergone many transformations since it was first
published in 1952. Many of these changes occurred because the uses for the DSM changed. However,
the greatest changes began with the use of extensive empirical research to guide the creation of the
classification system and its continued revisions.
In order to assess and diagnose patients, you must learn to use the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, usually abbreviated as the DSM-5, to render a diagnosis. In this
second week of the course, you will examine how DSM-5 is organized and how clinicians use it to render
diagnoses.
Review the Learning Resources this week, with special emphasis on viewing the Diagnostic
Criteria video. This video explains the purpose and organization of the DSM-5 classification system, the
purpose of the ICD-10 coding system, their relationship to one another, and the importance to the
PMHNP role.

Discussion: The Psychiatric Evaluation and Evidence-Based Rating Scales
Assessment tools have two primary purposes: 1) to measure illness and diagnose clients, and 2) to
measure a client’s response to treatment. Often, you will find that multiple assessment tools are
designed to measure the same condition or response. Not all tools, however, are appropriate for use in
all clinical situations. You must consider the strengths and weaknesses of each tool to select the
appropriate assessment tool for your client. For this Discussion, as you examine the assessment tool
assigned to you by the Course Instructor, consider its use in psychotherapy.

Photo Credit: [shironosov]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
To Prepare:
 Review this week's Learning Resources and reflect on the insights they provide regarding
psychiatric assessment and diagnosis.
 Consider the elements of the psychiatric interview, history, and examination.
 Consider the assessment tool assigned to you by the Course Instructor.
By Day 3 of Week 2
Post a brief explanation of three important components of the psychiatric interview and why you
consider these elements important. Explain the psychometric properties of the rating scale you were
assigned. Explain when it is appropriate to use this rating scale with clients during the psychiatric
interview and how the scale is helpful to a nurse practitioner’s psychiatric assessment. Support your
approach with evidence-based literature.
Read a selection of your colleagues’ responses.
By Day 6 of Week 2
Respond to at least two of your colleagues on 2 different days by comparing your assessment tool to
theirs.
Note: For this Discussion, you are required to complete your initial post before you will be able to view
and respond to your colleagues’ postings. Begin by clicking on the "Post to Discussion Question" link, and
then select "Create Thread" to complete your initial post. Remember, once you click on Submit, you
cannot delete or edit your own posts, and you cannot post anonymously. Please check your post carefully
before clicking on Submit!
Submission and Grading Information
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Week 2 Discussion Rubric

Post by Day 3 of Week 2 and Respond by Day 6 of Week 2

To Participate in this Discussion:
Week 2 Discussion

What’s Coming Up in Module 2?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
In Module 2, you will begin a systematic review of mental health disorders. You will apply concepts,
theories, and principles related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning, and recording patient
information. You will also formulate differential diagnoses for patients across the lifespan using DSM-
5 criteria.
Next Module

To go to the next module:
Module 2

Week 3: Mood Disorders
While most people experience the sadness or grief at some point in their lives, it is typically of short
duration and may occur in response to some type of loss. Clinically significant depression, on the other
hand, is more disruptive and serious. It lasts longer and has more symptoms that interfere with daily
functioning.
This week, you will explore the differences among mood disorders such as depressive, bipolar, and
related disorders, and you will examine challenges in properly differentiating among them for the
purpose of accurately rendering a diagnosis. You also will look at steps that can be taken to increase the
likelihood that patients who are diagnosed with these disorders benefit from treatment and refrain from
physically harming themselves or others.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
 Apply concepts, theories, and principles related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning,
and recording patient information
 Formulate differential diagnoses using DSM-5 criteria for patients with mood disorders across
the lifespan

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Bipolar and related disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical
manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm03

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Depressive disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of m
ental disorders (5th ed.).

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 8, Mood Disorders

 Chapter 31, Child Psychiatry (Section 31.12 only)

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Bipolar disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Depressive disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (1992). Mood disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2005). Bipolar disorder in children [Video]. Walden University.

MedEasy. (2017). Mood disorders (depression, mania/bipolar, everything in between) | USMLE &
COMLEX [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=59umGpQyaHs

Video Case Selections for Assignment (click to expand/reduce)

Select one of the following videos to use for your Assignment this week. Then, access the document
“Case History Reports” and review the additional data about the patient in the specific video number
you selected.

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 2 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-2

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 8 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-8

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 18 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-18

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 28 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-28

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 38 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-38

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 43 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-43

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 118 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-118

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 144 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-144

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 150 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-150

Document: Case History Reports

Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Mood Disorders

Photo Credit: Getty Images
Accurately diagnosing depressive disorders can be challenging given their periodic and, at times, cyclic
nature. Some of these disorders occur in response to stressors and, depending on the cultural history of
the client, may affect their decision to seek treatment. Bipolar disorders can also be difficult to properly
diagnose. While clients with a bipolar or related disorder will likely have to contend with the disorder
indefinitely, many find that the use of medication and evidence-based treatments have favorable
outcomes.
To Prepare:
 Review this week’s Learning Resources. Consider the insights they provide about assessing and
diagnosing mood disorders.
 Download the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template, which you will use to complete
this Assignment. Also review the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar to see an
example of a completed evaluation document.
 By Day 1 of this week, select a specific video case study to use for this Assignment from the
Video Case Selections choices in the Learning Resources. View your assigned video case and
review the additional data for the case in the “Case History Reports” document, keeping the
requirements of the evaluation template in mind.
 Consider what history would be necessary to collect from this patient.
 Consider what interview questions you would need to ask this patient.
 Identify at least three possible differential diagnoses for the patient.
By Day 7 of Week 3
Complete and submit your Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation, including your differential diagnosis
and critical-thinking process to formulate a primary diagnosis. Incorporate the following into your
responses in the template:
 Subjective: What details did the patient provide regarding their chief complaint and
symptomology to derive your differential diagnosis? What is the duration and severity of their
symptoms? How are their symptoms impacting their functioning in life?
 Objective: What observations did you make during the psychiatric assessment?
 Assessment: Discuss the patient’s mental status examination results. What were your
differential diagnoses? Provide a minimum of three possible diagnoses with supporting
evidence, listed in order from highest priority to lowest priority. Compare the DSM-5 diagnostic
criteria for each differential diagnosis and explain what DSM-5 criteria rules out the differential
diagnosis to find an accurate diagnosis. Explain the critical-thinking process that led you to the

primary diagnosis you selected. Include pertinent positives and pertinent negatives for the
specific patient case.
 Reflection notes: What would you do differently with this client if you could conduct the session
over? Also include in your reflection a discussion related to legal/ethical considerations
(demonstrate critical thinking beyond confidentiality and consent for treatment!), health
promotion and disease prevention taking into consideration patient factors (such as age, ethnic
group, etc.), PMH, and other risk factors (e.g., socioeconomic, cultural background, etc.).
Submission and Grading Information
To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:
 Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK3Assgn+last name+first
initial.(extension)” as the name.
 Click the Week 3 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
 Click the Week 3 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from
this area.
 Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document
you saved as “WK3Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
 If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my
paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
 Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:
Week 3 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:
Submit your Week 3 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 3

To participate in this Assignment:

Week 3 Assignment

What’s Coming Up in Week 4?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
In Week 4, you will continue to practice your assessment and diagnosis skills, focusing next week on
anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).
Next Week

To go to the next week:
Week 4

Week 4: Anxiety Disorders, PTSD, and OCD
Your own experiences might tell you that expectations from family, friends, and work—as well as your
own expectations regarding achievement, success, and happiness—can create stress. Stressors are a
normal part of life, and stress traditionally has been viewed as an adaptive function with a set of
physiological responses to a stressor. In a situation where stress is perceived, the organism is
physiologically prepared to attack or flee from the threat. Those with effective fight or flight responses
tended to survive long enough to reproduce, so we are descended from those who are genetically
hardwired for self-protection. When you experience stress, your biology, emotions, social support,
motivation, environment, attitude, immune function, and wellness all feel the ripple effect.
This stress response is an adaptive response the human body has to threats; however, stress can also be
difficult to handle and—depending upon the nature and intensity of the stress—can result in anxiety
disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, or trauma- and stressor-related disorders. This week, you will
focus on these disorders and explore strategies to accurately assess and diagnose them.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
 Apply concepts, theories, and principles related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning,
and recording patient information
 Formulate differential diagnoses using DSM-5 criteria for patients with anxiety disorders, PTSD,
and OCD across the lifespan

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Anxiety disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of
mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author. doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm05

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Obsessive compulsive and related disorders. In Diagnostic and
statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm06

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Trauma- and stressor-related disorders. In Diagnostic and
statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm07

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., and Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 9, Anxiety Disorders
 Chapter 10, Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders
 Chapter 11, Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders
 Chapter 31.11 Trauma-Stressor Related Disorders in Children
 Chapter 31.13 Anxiety Disorders in Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence
 Chapter 31.14 Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Childhood and Adolescence

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Anxiety disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2012). The neurobiology of anxiety [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Obsessive-compulsive disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Trauma, PTSD, and Trauma-Informed Care [Video]. Walden
University.

MedEasy. (2017). Anxiety, OCD, PTSD and related psychiatric disorders | USMLE & COMLEX [Video].
YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BwzQF9DTlY

Video Case Selections for Assignment (click to expand/reduce)

Select one of the following videos to use for your Assignment this week. Then, access the document
“Case History Reports” and review the additional data about the patient in the specific video number
you selected.

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 15 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-15

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 21 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-21

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 37 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-37

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 40 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-40

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 55 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-55

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 85 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-85

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 95 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-95

Document: Case History Reports

Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Anxiety Disorders, PTSD, and OCD
“Fear,” according to the DSM-5, “is the emotional response to real or perceived imminent threat,
whereas anxiety is anticipation of future threat” (APA, 2013). All anxiety disorders contain some degree
of fear or anxiety symptoms (often in combination with avoidant behaviors), although their causes and
severity differ. Trauma-related disorders may also, but not necessarily, contain fear and anxiety
symptoms, but their primary distinguishing criterion is exposure to a traumatic event. Trauma can occur
at any point in life. It might not surprise you to discover that traumatic events are likely to have a
greater effect on children than on adults. Early-life traumatic experiences, such as childhood sexual
abuse, may influence the physiology of the developing brain. Later in life, there is a chronic hyperarousal
of the stress response, making the individual vulnerable to further stress and stress-related disease.

Photo Credit: Hill Street Studios / Blend Images / Getty Images
For this Assignment, you practice assessing and diagnosing patients with anxiety disorders, PTSD, and
OCD. Review the DSM-5 criteria for the disorders within these classifications before you get started, as
you will be asked to justify your differential diagnosis with DSM-5 criteria.
To Prepare:
 Review this week’s Learning Resources and consider the insights they provide about assessing
and diagnosing anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and trauma- and stressor-related disorders.
 Download the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template, which you will use to complete
this Assignment. Also review the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar to see an
example of a completed evaluation document.
 By Day 1 of this week, select a specific video case study to use for this Assignment from the
Video Case Selections choices in the Learning Resources. View your assigned video case and
review the additional data for the case in the “Case History Reports” document, keeping the
requirements of the evaluation template in mind.
 Consider what history would be necessary to collect from this patient.
 Consider what interview questions you would need to ask this patient.
 Identify at least three possible differential diagnoses for the patient.

By Day 7 of Week 4
Complete and submit your Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation, including your differential diagnosis
and critical-thinking process to formulate primary diagnosis.
Incorporate the following into your responses in the template:
 Subjective: What details did the patient provide regarding their chief complaint and
symptomology to derive your differential diagnosis? What is the duration and severity of their
symptoms? How are their symptoms impacting their functioning in life?
 Objective: What observations did you make during the psychiatric assessment?
 Assessment: Discuss the patient’s mental status examination results. What were your
differential diagnoses? Provide a minimum of three possible diagnoses with supporting
evidence, listed in order from highest priority to lowest priority. Compare the DSM-5 diagnostic
criteria for each differential diagnosis and explain what DSM-5 criteria rules out the differential
diagnosis to find an accurate diagnosis. Explain the critical-thinking process that led you to the
primary diagnosis you selected. Include pertinent positives and pertinent negatives for the
specific patient case.
 Reflection notes: What would you do differently with this client if you could conduct the session
over? Also include in your reflection a discussion related to legal/ethical considerations
(demonstrate critical thinking beyond confidentiality and consent for treatment!), health
promotion and disease prevention taking into consideration patient factors (such as age, ethnic
group, etc.), PMH, and other risk factors (e.g., socioeconomic, cultural background, etc.).
Submission and Grading Information
To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:
 Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK4Assgn+last name+first
initial.(extension)” as the name.
 Click the Week 4 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
 Click the Week 4 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from
this area.
 Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document
you saved as “WK4Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
 If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my
paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
 Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Week 4 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:
Submit your Week 4 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 4

To participate in this Assignment:
Week 4 Assignment

What’s Coming Up in Week 5?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
Next week, you will continue to practice your assessment and diagnosis skills, focusing on disruptive,
impulse-control, conduct, dissociative, and somatic symptom-related disorders.
Midterm Exam
You should also begin studying for your midterm exam, which is completed in Week 6. This will be a 100-
question, multiple-choice exam covering all topics in Week 1–Week 6 of the course. The exams in your
MSN program are designed to test your knowledge in preparation for your certification exam and to
simulate the certification exam environment. Accordingly, no outside resources, including books, notes,
websites, or any other type of resource, may be used to help you complete the exams in your courses.

Photo Credit: [Vergeles_Andrey]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
Next Week

To go to the next week:
Week 5

Week 5: Disruptive, Impulse-Control, and Conduct Disorders; Dissociative and Somatic Symptom-Related
Disorders
Consider the following two scenarios:
Tim is a 6-year-old boy brought to the family medicine clinic for an initial visit. On entering the
examination room, the physician observed Tim spinning in circles on the stool while his mother pled, “If I
have to tell you one more time to sit down….” Tim was not permitted to begin first grade until his
immunizations were updated. His mother explained that Tim had visited several physicians for
immunization but was so disruptive that the physicians and nurses always gave up. She hoped that with
a new physician, Tim might comply. The mother described a several-year history of aggressive and
destructive behavior as well as four school suspensions during kindergarten. He often becomes
“uncontrollable” at home and has broken dishes and furniture. Last year, Tim was playing with the gas
stove and started a small fire. Tim frequently pulls the family dog around by its tail. Tim's older sisters
watched him in the past but have refused to do so since he threw a can of soup at one of them. Tim's
father is a long-haul truck driver who sees Tim every 3 to 4 weeks (Searight et al., 2001).
Wallace is a recently retired 55-year-old man and is the primary caregiver for his wife, who is currently
undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer. As his wife became weaker from the treatment, Wallace
became increasingly anxious about his own ability to care for his wife and his sense of agency in the
situation. After a serious infection led his wife to be hospitalized, Wallace’s symptoms grew worse. He
stopped eating and lost 25 pounds during a matter of weeks. On a trip to the grocery store to purchase
food for the household, Wallace had to stop and ask directions to get back to the house at which he had
lived for 15 years. This further exacerbated his depression and anxiety and he grew fearful of leaving the
home, often sitting in one chair for hours without moving.

Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our Verified MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS:NRNP 6635 The history of the Diagnosis of Mental Disorders

This week, you explore three disparate groupings of disorders. With the first—disruptive, impulse-
control and conduct disorders—patients experience issues with self-control of emotions or behavior
that involve aggression, destruction/violating others’ rights, defiance, or violating societal norms.
Secondly, dissociative disorders involve a disconnection from elements in a person’s life, such as sense
of identity, memories, environment, or perception of time. Lastly, somatic symptom-related disorders
deal with excessive thoughts, feelings, or behaviors related to physical symptoms (e.g., pain,
gastrointestinal issues) that cannot be fully explained by diagnosed medical conditions.
Conduct Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment in Primary Care by Searight, H. R., Rottnek, F., Abby, S. L., in American Family Physician, Vol. 63/ Issue 8. Copyright 2001 by American Academy of Family Physicians.
Reprinted by permission of American Academy of Family Physicians via the Copyright Clearance Center.

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders. In
Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm15

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Dissociative disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of
mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author. doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm08

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Somatic symptom and related disorders. In Diagnostic and
statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm09

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 12, Dissociative Disorders
 Chapter 13, Psychosomatic Medicine
 Chapter 19, Disruptive, Impulse-Control, and Conduct Disorders
 Chapter 31, Child Psychiatry (Sections 31.13 and 31.14 only)

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Dissociative disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Impulse and conduct disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Somatic symptoms and related disorders [Video]. Walden
University.

MedEasy. (2017). Somatic symptoms and factitious disorders | USMLE & COMLEX [Video].
YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-NN8fHB_a4

Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Disruptive, Impulse-Control, Conduct, Dissociative, and Somatic
Symptom-Related Disorders
Assessing patients with symptoms related to the disorders you are exploring this week pose some
particular challenges for which the PMHNP should be prepared. Disruptive, impulse-control, and
conduct disorders may involve aggressive outbursts, anger, deceitfulness, and unpredictability. Eliciting
the needed interview and history data requires special care, self-control, and deliberateness on the part
of the clinician. Several structured or semi-structured clinical interview tools exist for patients and, in
the case of minors, for parents as well.
There is no Assignment due this week. Use this quiet week to work on your practicum Comprehensive
Psychiatric Evaluation and Case Presentation if you are taking the two courses concurrently.

What’s Coming Up in Week 6?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
In Week 6, you explore eating, sleeping, and elimination disorders through your Learning Resources. You
also complete a midterm exam on the topics covered in the course thus far.
Next Week

To go to the next week:
Week 6

Week 6: Eating, Sleeping, and Elimination Disorders
The process of assessment and diagnosis is complex. At the initial meeting, clients may want to vent
about multiple areas in their lives, and they may not necessarily understand the assessment process or
what kind of information the advanced practice nurse needs to elicit to diagnose. PMHNPs must strike a
balance between keeping the assessment focused and structuring it in such a way that clients are
encouraged to paint a complete picture of their chief complaint and history of present illness. If a client
says that he or she is having a hard time dealing with family, difficulty in relationships, not eating
regularly, or not sleeping, counselors must know how to listen and ask questions that can pull more
information needed for an accurate diagnosis.
You are now at the halfway point of the course and have explored the assessment and diagnosis of
many categories of disorder from the DSM-5. This week, you put your knowledge of concepts related to
psychopathology and diagnostic reasoning to the test by completing a midterm exam. Your Learning
Resources this week focus on eating, sleeping, and elimination disorders. Although you will not
complete a comprehensive client assessment on a patient with these disorders, be sure to review the
resources on them because they are included on the midterm.
Learning Objective
Students will:
 Apply concepts related to psychopathology and diagnostic reasoning in advanced practice
nursing care in psychiatric and mental health settings

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013h). Feeding and eating disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical
manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm10

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Elimination disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of
mental disorders (5th ed.). https://doi-
org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm11

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Sleep-wake disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of
mental disorders (5th ed.). https://doi-
org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm12

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 15 Feeding and Eating Disorders
 Chapter 16 Normal Sleep and Sleep-Wake Disorders
 Chapter 31.9 Feeding and Eating Disorders of Infancy or Early Childhood
 Chapter 31.10 Elimination Disorders

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Eating disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2013). The new DSM-5 diagnosis: Understanding & treating binge
eating disorder [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Elimination disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Sleep disorders [Video]. Walden University.

MedEasy. (2017b). Eating disorders (anorexia, bulimia, and binge-eating disorder) | USMLE &
COMLEX [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bD8KCcipGaY

Midterm Exam
This exam will cover the following topics relevant to assessment and diagnosis across the lifespan:

 History and theories of psychopathology
 The psychiatric interview, history, and examination
 Rating scales
 Mood disorders
 Anxiety disorders, PTSD, OCD
 Disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders
 Eating, sleeping, and elimination disorders

Photo Credit: [Vergeles_Andrey]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
Prior to starting the exam, you should review all of your materials. There is a 2.5-hour time limit to
complete this 100-question exam. You may only attempt this exam once.
This exam is a test of your knowledge in preparation for your certification exam. No outside
resources—including books, notes, websites, or any other type of resource—are to be used to complete
this exam. You are expected to comply with Walden University’s Code of Conduct.
By Day 7 of Week 6
Complete your exam.
Submission and Grading Information
Grading Criteria

To access your Exam:
Week 6 Midterm Exam

What’s Coming Up in Module 3?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
In Module 3, you continue to explore the assessment and diagnosis of mental health disorders by
applying concepts related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning, and documentation. Through
these assignments, you will continue to refine your ability to formulate differential diagnoses based
on DSM-5 criteria.
Next Module

To go to the next module:
Module 3

Week 4: Anxiety Disorders, PTSD, and OCD
Your own experiences might tell you that expectations from family, friends, and work—as well as your
own expectations regarding achievement, success, and happiness—can create stress. Stressors are a
normal part of life, and stress traditionally has been viewed as an adaptive function with a set of
physiological responses to a stressor. In a situation where stress is perceived, the organism is
physiologically prepared to attack or flee from the threat. Those with effective fight or flight responses
tended to survive long enough to reproduce, so we are descended from those who are genetically
hardwired for self-protection. When you experience stress, your biology, emotions, social support,
motivation, environment, attitude, immune function, and wellness all feel the ripple effect.
This stress response is an adaptive response the human body has to threats; however, stress can also be
difficult to handle and—depending upon the nature and intensity of the stress—can result in anxiety
disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, or trauma- and stressor-related disorders. This week, you will
focus on these disorders and explore strategies to accurately assess and diagnose them.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
 Apply concepts, theories, and principles related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning,
and recording patient information
 Formulate differential diagnoses using DSM-5 criteria for patients with anxiety disorders, PTSD,
and OCD across the lifespan

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Anxiety disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of
mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author. doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm05

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Obsessive compulsive and related disorders. In Diagnostic and
statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm06

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Trauma- and stressor-related disorders. In Diagnostic and
statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm07

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., and Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 9, Anxiety Disorders
 Chapter 10, Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders
 Chapter 11, Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders
 Chapter 31.11 Trauma-Stressor Related Disorders in Children
 Chapter 31.13 Anxiety Disorders in Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence
 Chapter 31.14 Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Childhood and Adolescence

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Anxiety disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2012). The neurobiology of anxiety [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Obsessive-compulsive disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Trauma, PTSD, and Trauma-Informed Care [Video]. Walden
University.

MedEasy. (2017). Anxiety, OCD, PTSD and related psychiatric disorders | USMLE & COMLEX [Video].
YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BwzQF9DTlY

Video Case Selections for Assignment (click to expand/reduce)

Select one of the following videos to use for your Assignment this week. Then, access the document
“Case History Reports” and review the additional data about the patient in the specific video number
you selected.

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 15 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-15

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 21 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-21

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 37 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-37

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 40 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-40

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 55 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-55

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 85 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-85

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 95 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-95

Document: Case History Reports

Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Anxiety Disorders, PTSD, and OCD
“Fear,” according to the DSM-5, “is the emotional response to real or perceived imminent threat,
whereas anxiety is anticipation of future threat” (APA, 2013). All anxiety disorders contain some degree
of fear or anxiety symptoms (often in combination with avoidant behaviors), although their causes and
severity differ. Trauma-related disorders may also, but not necessarily, contain fear and anxiety
symptoms, but their primary distinguishing criterion is exposure to a traumatic event. Trauma can occur
at any point in life. It might not surprise you to discover that traumatic events are likely to have a
greater effect on children than on adults. Early-life traumatic experiences, such as childhood sexual
abuse, may influence the physiology of the developing brain. Later in life, there is a chronic hyperarousal
of the stress response, making the individual vulnerable to further stress and stress-related disease.

Photo Credit: Hill Street Studios / Blend Images / Getty Images
For this Assignment, you practice assessing and diagnosing patients with anxiety disorders, PTSD, and
OCD. Review the DSM-5 criteria for the disorders within these classifications before you get started, as
you will be asked to justify your differential diagnosis with DSM-5 criteria.
To Prepare:
 Review this week’s Learning Resources and consider the insights they provide about assessing
and diagnosing anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and trauma- and stressor-related disorders.
 Download the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template, which you will use to complete
this Assignment. Also review the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar to see an
example of a completed evaluation document.
 By Day 1 of this week, select a specific video case study to use for this Assignment from the
Video Case Selections choices in the Learning Resources. View your assigned video case and
review the additional data for the case in the “Case History Reports” document, keeping the
requirements of the evaluation template in mind.
 Consider what history would be necessary to collect from this patient.
 Consider what interview questions you would need to ask this patient.
 Identify at least three possible differential diagnoses for the patient.

By Day 7 of Week 4
Complete and submit your Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation, including your differential diagnosis
and critical-thinking process to formulate primary diagnosis.
Incorporate the following into your responses in the template:
 Subjective: What details did the patient provide regarding their chief complaint and
symptomology to derive your differential diagnosis? What is the duration and severity of their
symptoms? How are their symptoms impacting their functioning in life?
 Objective: What observations did you make during the psychiatric assessment?
 Assessment: Discuss the patient’s mental status examination results. What were your
differential diagnoses? Provide a minimum of three possible diagnoses with supporting
evidence, listed in order from highest priority to lowest priority. Compare the DSM-5 diagnostic
criteria for each differential diagnosis and explain what DSM-5 criteria rules out the differential
diagnosis to find an accurate diagnosis. Explain the critical-thinking process that led you to the
primary diagnosis you selected. Include pertinent positives and pertinent negatives for the
specific patient case.
 Reflection notes: What would you do differently with this client if you could conduct the session
over? Also include in your reflection a discussion related to legal/ethical considerations
(demonstrate critical thinking beyond confidentiality and consent for treatment!), health
promotion and disease prevention taking into consideration patient factors (such as age, ethnic
group, etc.), PMH, and other risk factors (e.g., socioeconomic, cultural background, etc.).
Submission and Grading Information
To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:
 Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK4Assgn+last name+first
initial.(extension)” as the name.
 Click the Week 4 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
 Click the Week 4 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from
this area.
 Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document
you saved as “WK4Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
 If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my
paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
 Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Week 4 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:
Submit your Week 4 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 4

To participate in this Assignment:
Week 4 Assignment

What’s Coming Up in Week 5?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
Next week, you will continue to practice your assessment and diagnosis skills, focusing on disruptive,
impulse-control, conduct, dissociative, and somatic symptom-related disorders.
Midterm Exam
You should also begin studying for your midterm exam, which is completed in Week 6. This will be a 100-
question, multiple-choice exam covering all topics in Week 1–Week 6 of the course. The exams in your
MSN program are designed to test your knowledge in preparation for your certification exam and to
simulate the certification exam environment. Accordingly, no outside resources, including books, notes,
websites, or any other type of resource, may be used to help you complete the exams in your courses.

Photo Credit: [Vergeles_Andrey]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
Next Week

To go to the next week:
Week 5

Week 7: Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders; Medication-Induced
Movement Disorders
At age 18, Rose rented her first apartment in the city. Although she had a short commute to work, Rose
did not enjoy the chaos and noise of the city. Within months, Rose left her apartment in the city for a
small, rural cabin in the country. It was then that Rose began to withdraw from family and friends.
Generally, she avoided contact with others. Her co-workers noticed random, obscure drawings on scrap
paper at her desk. Additionally, her co-workers noticed other strange behaviors. Frequently, Rose would
whisper to herself, appear startled when people approached her desk, and stare at the ceiling at various
times throughout the day.
For individuals with disorders such as schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, the development of
mental disorder seldom occurs with a singular, defining symptom. Rather, many who experience such
disorders show a range of unique symptoms. This range of symptoms may impede an individual's ability
to function in daily life. As a result, clinicians address a patient’s ability or inability to function in life.
This week, you explore psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. You also explore medication-
induced movement disorders and formulate a diagnosis for a patient in a case study.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
 Apply concepts, theories, and principles related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning,
and recording patient information
 Formulate differential diagnoses using DSM-5 criteria for patients with schizophrenia, other
psychotic disorders, and medication-induced movement disorders across the life span

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American  Psychiatric Association. (2013). Medication-induced movement disorders and other adverse
effects of medication. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed., pp. 709–714).
Author.

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders. In
Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm02

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 7, Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders
 Chapter 29.2, Medication Induced-Movement Disorders
 Chapter 31.15, Early-Onset Schizophrenia

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar

Document: NRNP 6635 Final Study Guide

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders [Video]. Walden
University.

MedEasy. (2017). Psychotic disorders | USMLE & COMLEX [Video]. YouTube.

Video Case Selections for Assignment (click to expand/reduce)

Select one of the following videos to use for your Assignment this week. Then, access the document
“Case History Reports” and review the additional data about the patient in the specific video number
you selected.

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 9 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-9

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 24 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-24

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2016). Training title 29 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-29

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 134 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-134

Document: Case History Reports

Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Schizophrenia, Other Psychotic Disorders, and
Medication-Induced Movement Disorders

Photo Credit: [Hero Images]/[Hero Images]/Getty Images
Psychotic disorders and schizophrenia are some of the most complicated and challenging diagnoses in
the DSM. The symptoms of psychotic disorders may appear quite vivid in some patients; with others,
symptoms may be barely observable. Additionally, symptoms may overlap among disorders. For
example, specific symptoms, such as neurocognitive impairments, social problems, and illusions may
exist in patients with schizophrenia but are also contributing symptoms for other psychotic disorders.
For this Assignment, you will analyze a case study related to schizophrenia, another psychotic disorder,
or a medication-induced movement disorder.
To Prepare:
 Review this week’s Learning Resources and consider the insights they provide about assessing
and diagnosing psychotic disorders. Consider whether experiences of psychosis-related

symptoms are always indicative of a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Think about alternative
diagnoses for psychosis-related symptoms.
 Download the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template, which you will use to complete
this Assignment. Also review the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar to see an
example of a completed evaluation document.
 By Day 1 of this week, select a specific video case study to use for this Assignment from the
Video Case Selections choices in the Learning Resources. View your assigned video case and
review the additional data for the case in the “Case History Reports” document, keeping the
requirements of the evaluation template in mind.
 Consider what history would be necessary to collect from this patient.
 Consider what interview questions you would need to ask this patient.
 Identify at least three possible differential diagnoses for the patient.
By Day 7 of Week 7
Complete and submit your Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation, including your differential diagnosis
and critical-thinking process to formulate primary diagnosis.
Incorporate the following into your responses in the template:
 Subjective: What details did the patient provide regarding their chief complaint and
symptomology to derive your differential diagnosis? What is the duration and severity of their
symptoms? How are their symptoms impacting their functioning in life?
 Objective: What observations did you make during the psychiatric assessment?
 Assessment: Discuss the patient’s mental status examination results. What were your
differential diagnoses? Provide a minimum of three possible diagnoses with supporting
evidence, listed in order from highest priority to lowest priority. Compare the DSM-5 diagnostic
criteria for each differential diagnosis and explain what DSM-5 criteria rules out the differential
diagnosis to find an accurate diagnosis. Explain the critical-thinking process that led you to the
primary diagnosis you selected. Include pertinent positives and pertinent negatives for the
specific patient case.
 Reflection notes: What would you do differently with this client if you could conduct the session
over? Also include in your reflection a discussion related to legal/ethical considerations
(demonstrate critical thinking beyond confidentiality and consent for treatment!), health
promotion and disease prevention taking into consideration patient factors (such as age, ethnic
group, etc.), PMH, and other risk factors (e.g., socioeconomic, cultural background, etc.).
Submission and Grading Information
To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:
 Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK7Assgn+last name+first
initial.(extension)” as the name.

 Click the Week 7 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
 Click the Week 7 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from
this area.
 Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document
you saved as “WK7Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
 If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my
paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
 Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:
Week 7 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:
Submit your Week 7 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 7

To participate in this Assignment:
Week 7 Assignment

What’s Coming Up in Week 8?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
In Week 8, you will continue to practice your assessment and diagnosis skills, focusing next week on
substance-related disorders.
Next Week

To go to the next week:
Week 8

Week 8: Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders
Many individuals seeking treatment meet the criteria for both mental health and substance-related
disorders. Regardless of whether you specialize in substance-related disorders, all advanced practice
nurses should know their signs and symptoms and how to assess and diagnose them. There are
assessment and screening tools available to clinicians, and a plethora of information can be obtained
through the diagnostic interview. It takes time and experience to know what types of questions to ask to
gain the most information, in addition to a basic knowledge of the substances and behaviors you are
trying to assess. It can be complicated to sort out substance use disorders from other mental health
disorders, but most clients seeking treatment have comorbidities.
This week, you apply DSM-5 substance use and addictive criteria as you formulate a diagnosis for a
patient in a case study.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
 Apply concepts, theories, and principles related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning,
and recording patient information
 Formulate differential diagnoses using DSM-5 criteria for patients with substance-related and
addictive disorders across the lifespan

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Substance related and addictive disorders. In Diagnostic and
statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm16

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 20, Substance Use and Addictive Disorders
 Chapter 31.16, Adolescent Substance Abuse

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Addictive disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Complex Care Consulting. (2018, April 4). Addiction neuroscience 101 [Video].
YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwZcPwlRRcc

Video Case Selections for Assignment (click to expand/reduce)

Select one of the following videos to use for your Assignment this week. Then, access the document
“Case History Reports” and review the additional data about the patient in the specific video number
you selected.

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 82 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-82

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 114-2 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-114-2

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2018). Training title 151 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-151

Document: Case History Reports

Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders
An important consideration when working with patients is their cultural background. Understanding an
individual's culture and personal experiences provides insight into who the person is and where he or
she may progress in the future. Culture helps to establish a sense of identity, as well as to set values,
behaviors, and purpose for individuals within a society. Culture may also contribute to a divide between
specific interpretations of cultural behavior and societal norms. What one culture may deem as
appropriate another culture may find inappropriate. As a result, it is important for advanced practice
nurses to remain aware of cultural considerations and interpretations of behavior for diagnosis,
especially with reference to substance-related disorders. At the same time, PMHNPs must balance their
professional and legal responsibilities for assessment and diagnosis with such cultural considerations
and interpretations.
For this Assignment, you will practice assessing and diagnosing a patient in a case study who is
experiencing a substance-related or addictive disorder. With this and all cases, remember to consider
the patient’s cultural background.
To Prepare:
 Review this week’s Learning Resources and consider the insights they provide.
 Review the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation template, which you will use to complete this
Assignment.
 By Day 1 of this week, select a specific video case study to use for this Assignment from the
Video Case Selections choices in the Learning Resources. View your assigned video case and
review the additional data for the case in the “Case History Reports” document, keeping the
requirements of the evaluation template in mind.
 Consider what history would be necessary to collect from this patient.
 Consider what interview questions you would need to ask this patient.
 Identify at least three possible differential diagnoses for the patient.
By Day 7 of Week 8
Complete and submit your Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation, including your differential diagnosis
and critical-thinking process to formulate primary diagnosis.
Incorporate the following into your responses in the template:
 Subjective: What details did the patient provide regarding their chief complaint and
symptomology to derive your differential diagnosis? What is the duration and severity of their
symptoms? How are their symptoms impacting their functioning in life?
 Objective: What observations did you make during the psychiatric assessment?

 Assessment: Discuss the patient’s mental status examination results. What were your
differential diagnoses? Provide a minimum of three possible diagnoses with supporting
evidence, listed in order from highest priority to lowest priority. Compare the DSM-5 diagnostic
criteria for each differential diagnosis and explain what DSM-5 criteria rules out the differential
diagnosis to find an accurate diagnosis. Explain the critical-thinking process that led you to the
primary diagnosis you selected. Include pertinent positives and pertinent negatives for the
specific patient case.
 Reflection notes: What would you do differently with this client if you could conduct the session
over? Also include in your reflection a discussion related to legal/ethical considerations
(demonstrate critical thinking beyond confidentiality and consent for treatment!), health
promotion and disease prevention taking into consideration patient factors (such as age, ethnic
group, etc.), PMH, and other risk factors (e.g., socioeconomic, cultural background, etc.).
Submission and Grading Information
To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:
 Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK8Assgn+last name+first
initial.(extension)” as the name.
 Click the Week 8 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
 Click the Week 8 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from
this area.
 Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document
you saved as “WK8Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
 If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my
paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
 Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:
Week 8 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:
Submit your Week 8 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 8

To participate in this Assignment:
Week 8 Assignment

What’s Coming Up in Week 9?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
In Week 9, you will continue to practice your assessment and diagnostic reasoning skills, focusing next
week on personality and paraphilic disorders.
Next Week

To go to the next week:
Week 9

Week 9: Personality and Paraphilic Disorders
What is the difference between observed patterns of personality and a personality disorder? Although
some patterns of behavior may contribute to an individual's personality, not all personality patterns may
be disorders. For example, if a person is described as cold, cerebral, and rigid, these are patterns that
might affect his or her personality but may not lead to a diagnosed disorder. As defined in the DSM, “A
personality disorder is an enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior that deviates markedly
from the expectations of one’s culture, is pervasive and inflexible, has an onset in adolescence or early
adulthood, is stable over time, and leads to distress or impairment” (APA, 2013, p. 645).
Specifically, personality disorders, such as antisocial personality disorders and borderline personality
disorders, present a pervasive, maladaptive pattern of inner experience and behavior that violate social
norms such as trust, honesty, and personal value.
This week, you explore the assessment and diagnosis of personality and paraphilic disorders in patients
across the lifespan.

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Personality disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of
mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author. doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm18

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Paraphilic disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of
mental disorders (5th ed., pp. 685–706). Author.

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 22, Personality Disorders
 Chapter 17, Human Sexuality and Sexual Dysfunction

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Sexual dysfunctions [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Paraphilic disorders [Video]. Walden University.

MedEasy. (2017). Personality disorders by clusters | USMLE & COMLEX [Video].
YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1tC2qNtH-o

Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Personality and Paraphilic Disorders
This week’s introduction explained that not all personality patterns represent disorders; it is pervasive
patterns that lead to life impairment that meet the criteria for a disorder. Similarly, paraphilic, or sexual,
behaviors fall on a spectrum and may or may not meet the criteria for a disorder. Sexual behaviors that
could be a symptom of a disorder (e.g., enacting specific fantasies or integrating a fetish object into
sexual activity) would only meet the criteria if they were present for more than six months and
significantly impacted social or occupational functioning.
There is no Assignment due this week. Use this quiet week to work on your practicum Comprehensive
Psychiatric Evaluation and Case Presentation if you are taking the two courses concurrently.

Photo Credit: [shironosov]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images

What’s Coming Up in Week 10?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
In Week 10, you will continue to practice your assessment and diagnostic reasoning skills, focusing next
week on neurocognitive and neurodevelopmental disorders.
Next Week

To go to the next week:

Week 10

Week 10: Neurocognitive and Neurodevelopmental Disorders
The human brain only constitutes approximately 2% of an individual's total body weight, a percentage
that pales in comparison to the brain's level of importance in human development (Koch, 2016).
Although externally protected by layers of membranes as well as the skull, the brain is not very resistant
to damage. Damage to the brain may compromise its functionality, which may, in turn, lead to
neurodevelopmental disorders in childhood and adolescence or neurocognitive disorders for any
number of reasons across the lifespan.
This week, you practice assessing and diagnosing neurocognitive and neurodevelopmental disorders
across the lifespan.
Reference: Koch, C. (2016, January 1). Does brain size matter? Scientific American. https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/does-brain-size-matter1/
Learning Objectives
Students will:
 Apply concepts, theories, and principles related to patient interviewing, diagnostic reasoning,
and recording patient information
 Formulate differential diagnoses using DSM-5 criteria for patients with neurocognitive and
neurodevelopmental disorders across the lifespan

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American  Psychiatric Association. (2013). Neurocognitive disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual
of mental disorders (5th ed., pp. 591–644). Author.

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Neurodevelopmental disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical
manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.
doi:10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm01

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 21, Neurocognitive Disorders
 Chapter 31, Child Psychiatry

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Template

Document: Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation Exemplar

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Neurocognitive disorders [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Neurodevelopmental disorders [Video]. Walden University.

MedEasy. (2016). Progressive neurocognitive disorders. | USMLE & COMLEX [Video]. YouTube.

Video Case Selections for Assignment (click to expand/reduce)

Select one of the following videos to use for your Assignment this week. Then, access the document
“Case History Reports” and review the additional data about the patient in the specific video number
you selected.

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 48 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-48

Symptom Media. (Producer). (2017). Training title 50 [Video]. https://video-alexanderstreet-
com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/watch/training-title-50

Document: Case History Reports

Assignment: Assessing and Diagnosing Patients With Neurocognitive and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

Photo Credit: Getty Images
Neurodevelopmental disorders begin in the developmental period of childhood and may continue
through adulthood. They may range from the very specific to a general or global impairment, and often
co-occur (APA, 2013). They include specific learning and language disorders, attention deficit
hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorders, and intellectual disabilities. Neurocognitive
disorders, on the other hand, represent a decline in one or more areas of prior mental function that is
significant enough to impact independent functioning. They may occur at any time in life and be caused
by factors such brain injury; diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, or Huntington’s; infection; or
stroke, among others.
For this Assignment, you will assess a patient in a case study who presents with a neurocognitive or
neurodevelopmental disorder.
To Prepare:
 Review this week’s Learning Resources and consider the insights they provide. Consider how
neurocognitive impairments may have similar presentations to other psychological disorders.
 Review the Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation template, which you will use to complete this
Assignment.
 By Day 1 of this week, select a specific video case study to use for this Assignment from the
Video Case Selections choices in the Learning Resources. View your assigned video case and
review the additional data for the case in the “Case History Reports” document, keeping the
requirements of the evaluation template in mind.
 Consider what history would be necessary to collect from this patient.
 Consider what interview questions you would need to ask this patient.
 Identify at least three possible differential diagnoses for the patient.

By Day 7 of Week 10
Complete and submit your Comprehensive Psychiatric Evaluation, including your differential diagnosis
and critical-thinking process to formulate primary diagnosis.
Incorporate the following into your responses in the template:
 Subjective: What details did the patient provide regarding their chief complaint and
symptomology to derive your differential diagnosis? What is the duration and severity of their
symptoms? How are their symptoms impacting their functioning in life?
 Objective: What observations did you make during the psychiatric assessment?
 Assessment: Discuss the patient’s mental status examination results. What were your
differential diagnoses? Provide a minimum of three possible diagnoses with supporting
evidence, listed in order from highest priority to lowest priority. Compare the DSM-5 diagnostic
criteria for each differential diagnosis and explain what DSM-5 criteria rules out the differential
diagnosis to find an accurate diagnosis. Explain the critical-thinking process that led you to the
primary diagnosis you selected. Include pertinent positives and pertinent negatives for the
specific patient case.
 Reflection notes: What would you do differently with this client if you could conduct the session
over? Also include in your reflection a discussion related to legal/ethical considerations
(demonstrate critical thinking beyond confidentiality and consent for treatment!), health
promotion and disease prevention taking into consideration patient factors (such as age, ethnic
group, etc.), PMH, and other risk factors (e.g., socioeconomic, cultural background, etc.).
Submission and Grading Information
To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:
 Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK10Assgn+last name+first
initial.(extension)” as the name.
 Click the Week 10 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
 Click the Week 10 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria
from this area.
 Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document
you saved as “WK10Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
 If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my
paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
 Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Week 10 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:
Submit your Week 10 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 10

To participate in this Assignment:
Week 10 Assignment

What’s Coming Up in Week 11?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
In Week 11, you explore gender identity disorders and psychiatric emergencies. You also complete your
final exam.
Next Week

To go to the next week:
Week 11

Week 11: Gender Identity Disorders; Psychiatric Emergencies
In the past, popular culture tended to present gender as an attribute that was dichotomous; that is, it
was either/or. To a certain extent, our culture, as well as many others, still portrays gender as equivalent
to biological sex assignment. We may still encounter this when we fill out forms or are otherwise asked
to identify ourselves, but nonbinary choices are increasingly common, as is the widespread acceptance
of a person’s choice of personal pronoun.
Current psychological and biological science sees gender as a continuum, and it is viewed as a cultural

attribute, not a biological one. As a cultural construct, gender and its expression vary widely. An
individual’s gender identify refers to whether they identify as male, female, or some other category.
Everyone has a gender identity. To meet the criteria for a gender identity disorder, however, a patient
must not only have gender manifestations that do not conform to their culture’s gender norms (e.g.,
wearing opposite sex clothing), but also experience significant distress and negative impact on their life
because of the gender incongruence.
Through the Learning Resources this week, you explore the assessment and diagnosis of gender identity
disorders and psychiatric emergencies. You will also complete your final exam, which will cover the
topics presented in Weeks 7–11.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
 Apply concepts related to psychopathology and diagnostic reasoning in advanced practice
nursing care in psychiatric and mental health settings

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Gender dysphoria. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of
mental disorders (5th ed.). https://doi-
org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm14

Sadock, B. J., Sadock, V. A., & Ruiz, P. (2015). Kaplan & Sadock’s synopsis of psychiatry (11th ed.).
Wolters Kluwer.
 Chapter 18, Gender Dysphoria
 Chapter 23, Emergency Psychiatric Medicine

American Psychiatric Association. (2016). What is gender dysphoria?
https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/gender-dysphoria/what-is-gender-dysphoria

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2016). Gender dysphoria [Video]. Walden University.

Classroom Productions. (Producer). (2015). Self-harm and suicide [Video]. Walden University.

Final Exam
This exam will cover assessment and diagnosis of the following across the lifespan:

 Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders
 Medication-induced movement disorders
 Substance related disorders
 Personality disorders
 Dissociative and somatic symptom-related disorders
 Paraphilic disorders
 Neurocognitive and neurodevelopmental disorders
 Sexuality and gender identity disorders
 Psychiatric emergencies

Photo Credit: [Vergeles_Andrey]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images
Prior to starting the exam, you should review all of your materials. There is a 2.5-hour time limit to
complete this 100-question exam. You may only attempt this exam once.
This exam is a test of your knowledge in preparation for your certification exam. No outside
resources—including books, notes, websites, or any other type of resource—are to be used to complete
this exam. You are expected to comply with Walden University’s Code of Conduct.
By Day 7 of Week 11
Complete your exam.
Submission and Grading Information

Grading Criteria

To access your Exam:
Week 11 Final Exam

What’s Coming Up?
Congratulations! After you have finished all of the assignments for this week, you have completed the
course. Please submit your Course Evaluation by Day 7.

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