Discussion: Interaction Between Nurse Informaticists and Other Specialists NURS 6051

Want create site? With Free visual composer you can do it easy.

Discussion: Interaction Between Nurse Informaticists and Other Specialists NURS 6051

Nature offers many examples of specialization and collaboration. Ant colonies and bee hives are but two examples of nature’s sophisticated organizations. Each thrives because their members specialize by tasks, divide labor, and collaborate to ensure food, safety, and general well-being of the colony or hive.

In this Discussion, you will reflect on your own observations of and/or experiences with informaticist collaboration. You will also propose strategies for how these collaborative experiences might be improved. Discussion: Interaction Between Nurse Informaticists and Other Specialists NURS 6051

Click here to ORDER NOW FOR AN ORIGINAL PAPER ASSIGNMENT

RE: Discussion – Week 3

My patients were communicated through pagers some years back when I started with this facility. However, sometimes last year, a technological device referred to as the I-Mobile was introduced and became a “must use” device for all nurses. I-Mobile is a cell phone which has a lot of functions to be learned. When this was introduced to us, all the nurses got a notification of the company’s email for compulsory training on how to use the device. Moreover, during this ongoing training, there were nurse informaticists on the ground to demonstrate and train all the staff on how to use this device. However, we were also trained on how to manipulate this device in case there are some difficulties. Furthermore, options of calling the information technologist were open in case there one cannot manipulate this device. During the training session, each of the staff will be with the patient with a device that was assigned to them while the nurse informaticists training the staff own a device too. This training was done on different days and sections as all unit staff must learn how to operate this device as long as there should be communication between patients and staff.

This device helps with the admission and discharges of patients. In addition, other inter-professional colleagues can be communicated through this device while other documentation such as incident reports and highlights of the policy and procedures can be found on this device. This device also sends alerts to all staff members in case information that involves all staff members are to be passed at the same time. It also assigns patients to different staff where the laboratory results can be viewed too. One problem that the company is still facing today is difficulty in operating this device by some staff and unwillingness to be adaptive to the new device. There is a strong resistance to change, especially among the older nurses who have been using the pagers for years. The creation of supportive knowledge culture and user-friendly infrastructure will prevent the resistance (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2018). With this new device, there is effective communication between the staff and patient to staff. However, there is failed communication sometimes.  Reaching a staff member involves logging in with a code, which means that if staff did not log in or if the staff is logged accidentally, communication will fail. Moreover, some hours might be so busy at work that one will even forget to log in. One strategy in solving this problem is to put an open notification in the nurse’s station to serve as a reminder to log in once any nurse resume duty.

Lastly, the continuous transformation of technology devices over time will improve the quality of health care provided and the general improvement of the health care system. Moreover, this will improve the interprofessional relationship as staff now communicates often than before. Moreover, this new technology has also helped in seeing patients faster than before; hence, reduced delay in attending to patients. Since it can also be used for charting notes, a nurse can actually chart in all her notes when communicating with the patient. The last note of the nurse that just handed over can also be viewed, which will help with an easy continuation of care.

References

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). The Nurse Informaticist [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning

Zeleke, A., Naziyok, T., Wilken, M., & Röhrig, R. (2018). An Online Differential Cost Estimator Tool to Support Cost Planning of Demographic and Health Surveys Using Mobile Electronic Device or Paper and Pen Methods: A Function of Sample Size. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 253, 11–15.

Of course, humans don’t fare too badly in this regard either. And healthcare is a great example. As specialists in the collection, access, and application of data, nurse informaticists collaborate with specialists on a regular basis to ensure that appropriate data is available to make decisions and take actions to ensure the general well-being of patients.

To Prepare:

Review the Resources and reflect on the evolution of nursing informatics from a science to a nursing specialty.

Consider your experiences with nurse Informaticists or technology specialists within your healthcare organization.

By Day 3 of Week 3

Post a description of experiences or observations about how nurse informaticists and/or data or technology specialists interact with other professionals within your healthcare organization. Suggest at least one strategy on how these interactions might be improved. Be specific and provide examples. Then, explain the impact you believe the continued evolution of nursing informatics as a specialty and/or the continued emergence of new technologies might have on professional interactions.

By Day 6 of Week 3

Respond to at least two of your colleagues* on two different days, offering one or more additional interaction strategies in support of the examples/observations shared or by offering further insight to the thoughts shared about the future of these interactions.

*Note: Throughout this program, your fellow students are referred to as colleagues.

Learning Resources

Required Readings

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Chapter 25, “The Art of Caring in Technology-Laden Environments” (pp. 525–535)
Chapter 26, “Nursing Informatics and the Foundation of Knowledge” (pp. 537–551)

Mosier, S., Roberts, W. D., & Englebright, J. (2019). A Systems-Level Method for Developing Nursing Informatics Solutions: The Role of Executive Leadership. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration, 49(11), 543-548.

Ng, Y. C., Alexander, S., & Frith, K. H. (2018). Integration of Mobile Health Applications in Health Information Technology Initiatives: Expanding Opportunities for Nurse Participation in Population Health. CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 36(5), 209-213.

Sipes, C. (2016). Project management: Essential skill of nurse informaticists. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 225, 252-256.

Submission and Grading Information Discussion: Interaction Between Nurse Informaticists and Other Specialists NURS 6051

The Role of the Informatics Specialist in Healthcare

As a nurse entering my 26th year in healthcare, I have witnessed a lot of the advancements in technology regarding the way healthcare is delivered today. When I was in nursing school, the golden standard was, “If it wasn’t charted, it wasn’t done.” This still holds true today, but within a much more advanced spectrum. Healthcare information technology is not only nursing specific. This is why healthcare information technology is now referred to as Nursing Informatics (NI). (Laureate Education, 2012). In today’s ever-increasing technological world, I am proud to acknowledge that every aspect of the healthcare delivery system and every healthcare professional is involved in professional interactions with technology specialists. (Sweeney, 2017).

In the healthcare organization at which I am employed, I work in a critical care area. There are numerous areas in which I experience the advancement of healthcare as a whole, through the advancements of technology. We use Advanced Intensive Care (AICU), the Electronic Health Record (EHR), and an electronic charting system that helps the entire healthcare team pull all of the information together. One of the most significant advancements that we have recently incorporated is tele-psych providers. Unfortunately, I live and work in an area where we are without any psychiatric professionals available for in-patient consults. Through this service, we can now provide much needed psychiatric consults to guide our physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, nurse techs, and safety sitters in these unique patient’s care path. It goes unsaid, but these advancements have been made through collaborative efforts and professional interactions. The benefits of telehealth and tele-psych services are proof that these services which incorporate technology and healthcare are a vital avenue for our future, and will continue to expand. (Khwaja, 2020).

This is a very exciting time for everyone involved in healthcare. This includes providers, data and technology specialists, patients, and even families. I for one, look forward to all of the future healthcare technological advancements!

References
Khwaja, T. (2020, February 14). The Benefits of Telehealth within Mental Health Care. Mental Health Weekly, 30(7). http://dx.doi.org/ https://doi.org/10.1002/mhw.32238
Laureate Education (Producer). (2012). Data, Information, Knowledge and Wisdom Continuum [Multimedia File]. Available from Walden University.
Sweeney, J. (2017, February 2). Healthcare Informatics. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 21(1). Retrieved from https://www.himss.org/library/healthcare-informatics

The Role of the Informatics Specialist in Healthcare

As a nurse entering my 26th year in healthcare, I have witnessed a lot of the advancements in technology regarding the way healthcare is delivered today. When I was in nursing school, the golden standard was, “If it wasn’t charted, it wasn’t done.” This statement still holds true today, but within a much more advanced spectrum. Healthcare information technology is not only nursing specific. This is why healthcare information technology is now referred to as Nursing Informatics (NI). (Laureate Education, 2012).

At my current place of employment, the nursing informatics specialist was one of the first nurses that I interacted with during new employee orientation. She had the lengthy job of orienting this class of nurses to our particular electronic health record (EHR), which spanned three days in length of our five-day classroom orientation. She had the daunting task of teaching us everything from how to use the clock-in system, how to use the electronic scheduling program, to how to document and interpret all the data used and evaluated inside of the EHR that we charted within. This information includes everything from how to enter vital signs, compute and analyze the early warning sign (EWS) score, to documenting assessments, and writing notes, and how and where to find patient histories and visit information, to only name a few. I was utterly overwhelmed. It was reassuring, though, knowing that she was always available for questions, and we had very knowledgeable nurse preceptors that were right by our sides. Through navigation of this system multiple times on orientation, these skills were easily mastered.

As far as the impact that I believe the continued evolution of nursing informatics as a specialty and the continued emergence of new technologies might have on professional interactions as nursing informatics evolves, our EHR system is updated every couple of months. In the realm of professional interactions, I am now a “super-user”. This role involves taking an active part in all EHR upgrades and making myself available during any downtime that comes along with the updates. I am the middle-man between the staff and the nursing informatics nurses and am in constant contact with them throughout the entire process. I round on all of the in-patient nursing units and the emergency department, to provide any assistance needed. Each time that an update is being installed, we have electronic downtime for which I then make sure each in-patient nursing unit and the emergency department is first adequately prepared for the downtime. These tasks include making sure everyone’s “downtime box” has a sufficient supply of paper orders, paper documentation, paper lab and radiology report sheets, and that everyone knows how to use these resources. Our downtime is usually set for the time of 0200, so I am also physically there to help wherever I can. Once the upgrade is complete, I then help manually enter paper data into the EHR.

This process is very involved, and usually runs smoothly, but one area of this process that could be improved upon often lies with the emergency department’s physicians. They do not like the lag that paper orders and results take time-wise, and are very vocal about this. All I feel I can do in this situation is to help calm and reassure them that everyone is doing the best that they can, but this sometimes does not quell their anxiety in an already tense situation. One strategy on how these interactions might be improved is by adding a nurse informatics specialist to be dedicated to the emergency department physicians to enhance communication of the process during the downtime. A study was conducted to explore ways for successful downtime strategies and decrease inconveniences. It also concurred that there was a need to “improve the mutual understanding regarding operations and needs of different departments in the hospital,” in which the emergency department was explicitly mentioned. (Larsen et al., 2019).

In today’s ever-increasing technological world, I am proud to acknowledge that every aspect of the healthcare delivery system and every healthcare professional is involved in professional interactions with technology specialists. (Sweeney, 2017). As far as improvements to be made to our downtime protocol, I am not sure how to bypass the paper charting while our systems are down. But with the speed of new advances in nursing informatics, I rest assured, knowing they are always working on solutions to these issues. This is an exhilarating time for everyone involved in healthcare, which includes providers, data and technology specialists, patients, and even families. I, for one, look forward to all of the future healthcare technological advancements! Discussion: Interaction Between Nurse Informaticists and Other Specialists NURS 6051

References
Larsen, E., Hoffman, D., Rivera, C., Kleiner, B. M., Wernz, C., & Ratwani, R. M. (2019, May). Continuing Patient Care During Electronic Health Record Downtime. Applied Clinical Informatics, 10(3), 495-504. http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1055/s-0039-1692678
Laureate Education (Producer). (2012). Data, Information, Knowledge and Wisdom Continuum [Multimedia File]. Available from Walden University.
Sweeney, J. (2017, February 2). Healthcare Informatics. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 21(1). Retrieved from https://www.himss.org/library/healthcare-informatics

RE: Discussion – Week 3

As a manger in a long-term care facility, I spend much of my day creating and maintaining care plans for our residents.  This at times involves working with the technology specialists via webex to make improvements or corrections in our electronic health record (Point Click Care).  During our most recent state survey we found that the canned text for some of our interventions in the care plans were not accurate.  For example, the interventions for c-difficile precautions stated that we placed soiled linens in red bags to be wasted with our other biohazardous materials.  This in fact is not the process for our facility.  Upon discovering this discrepancy, I had to call our technology specialists and explain our protocol for c-difficile.  Together we were able to make the necessary corrections.

We have since discovered other discrepancies in Point Click Care which has made me realize that there’s a communication gap between our facility and the technology specialists who maintain the canned text for care plans.  “Nurses, who do most of the EHR documentation (including plans of care, physiological parameters, assessments, interventions, and progress evaluations) in hospitals, are critical to care integration and patient safety” (Glassman, 2017, pg. 45).  It would be helpful if the canned text were reviewed quarterly for accuracy with the technology specialists and medical staff.  This would ensure the care plans are kept up to date on issues such as infection control policies/procedures, postsurgical precautions (such as with hip surgery), and pharmacology.

With continued improvements in nursing informatics I foresee a more transparent and communicative healthcare system.  In a 2016 article it was explained that “When a CNE is analyzing and synthesizing data, it’s typically done manually and is a very time- and labor- intensive process, in part, because technology systems have traditionally been built in silos” (Thew, 2016).  I hope to continue working with our technology specialists to create a universal care planning system that can increase data collection by streamlining terminology, policies and procedures.  “Documentation entered by nurses into EHRs, for the first time ever, is a potential source for discovering the impact of nursing care on patient outcomes and using the knowledge to improve care” (Macieria, 2017).

 

References

Glassman, K. S. (2017). Using data in nursing practice. American Nurse Today, 12(11), 45-47. Retrieved March 10, 2020, from https://www.myamericannurse.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ant11-Data-1030.pdf

Macieria, T. G. R.,Smith, M. B., Davis, N., Yao, Y. Wilkie, D. J., Lopex, K. D., & Keenan, G. (2017). Evidence of progress in making nursing practice visible using standardized nursing data: A systematic review. AMIA Annual Symposium Proceedings, 2017, 1205—1214. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5977718/

Thew, J. (2016, April 19). Big data means big potential, challenges for nurse execs. Retrieved from https://www.healthleadersmedia.com/nursing/big-data-means-big-potential-challenges-nurse-execs

Rubric Detail

Select Grid View or List View to change the rubric’s layout.
Content
Name: NURS_5051_Module02_Week03_Discussion_Rubric

Points Range: 45 (45%) – 50 (50%)
Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

Supported by at least three current, credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 40 (40%) – 44 (44%)
Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 35 (35%) – 39 (39%)
Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with two credible sources.

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 34 (34%)
Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately.

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible sources.

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.
Main Post: Timeliness

Points Range: 10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response

Points Range: 17 (17%) – 18 (18%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 15 (15%) – 16 (16%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 13 (13%) – 14 (14%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 12 (12%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Second Response

Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 12 (12%) – 13 (13%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 11 (11%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Participation

Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100
Name: NURS_5051_Module02_Week03_Discussion_Rubric

Module 2: The Role of the Informatics Specialist in Healthcare (Weeks 3-4)

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). The Nurse Informaticist [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
Analyze interactions between nurse informaticists, data/technology specialists, and other professionals in healthcare organizations
Recommend strategies to improve interactions between nurse informaticists and other professionals
Analyze how nursing informatics as a specialty and new technologies impact interactions between nurse informaticists and members of healthcare teams
Recommend nursing informatics projects to improve outcomes or efficiencies in healthcare organizations
Identify stakeholders impacted by nursing informatics projects
Analyze how nursing informatics projects improve outcomes or efficiencies in healthcare organizations
Identify technologies required for implementation of nursing informatics projects
Analyze the role of the nurse informaticist in nursing informatics project teams

Due By
Assignment
Week 3, Days 1–2
Read/Watch/Listen to the Learning Resources.
Compose your initial Discussion post.
Week 3, Day 3
Post your initial Discussion post.
Begin to compose your Assignment.
Week 3, Days 4-5
Review peer Discussion posts.
Compose your peer Discussion responses.
Continue to compose your Assignment.
Week 3, Day 6
Post at least two peer Discussion responses on two different days (and not the same day as the initial post).
Week 3, Day 7
Wrap up Discussion.
Deadline to submit your Assignment.
Week 4, Days 1-6
Continue to compose your Assignment
Week 4, Day 7
Deadline to submit your Assignment
Learning Resources

Required Readings
McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Chapter 25, “The Art of Caring in Technology-Laden Environments” (pp. 525–535)
Chapter 26, “Nursing Informatics and the Foundation of Knowledge” (pp. 537–551)
Mosier, S., Roberts, W. D., & Englebright, J. (2019). A Systems-Level Method for Developing Nursing Informatics Solutions: The Role of Executive Leadership. JONA: The Journal of Nursing Administration, 49(11), 543-548.
Ng, Y. C., Alexander, S., & Frith, K. H. (2018). Integration of Mobile Health Applications in Health Information Technology Initiatives: Expanding Opportunities for Nurse Participation in Population Health. CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing, 36(5), 209-213.
Sipes, C. (2016). Project management: Essential skill of nurse informaticists. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 225, 252-256.

Did you find apk for android? You can find new Free Android Games and apps.