Discussion: Data Application To Problem-Solving

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NURS 6051 Discussion: Data Application To Problem-Solving

Discussion: Data Application To Problem-Solving

Discussion: Data Application To Problem-Solving

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vise clients on financial matters. Meteorologists rely on weather data to forecast weather conditions, while realtors rely on data to advise on the purchase and sale of property. In these and other cases, data not only helps solve problems, but adds to the practitioner’s and the discipline’s body of knowledge.

Of course, the nursing profession also relies heavily on data. The field of nursing informatics aims to make sure nurses have access to the appropriate date to solve healthcare problems, make decisions in the interest of patients, and add to knowledge.

In this Discussion, you will consider a scenario that would benefit from access to data and how such access could facilitate both problem-solving and knowledge formation.

To Prepare:

Reflect on the concepts of informatics and knowledge work as presented in the Resources.
Consider a hypothetical scenario based on your own healthcare practice or organization that would require or benefit from the access/collection and application of data. Your scenario may involve a patient, staff, or management problem or gap.
By Day 3 of Week 1
Post a description of the focus of your scenario. Describe the data that could be used and how the data might be collected and accessed. What knowledge might be derived from that data? How would a nurse leader use clinic

RE: Discussion – Week 1

          Being an ICU nurse, I often times manage patients in the elderly population who experience intense sundowning. Similar to ICU psychosis (or delirium brought on by the constant stimulation of the ICU), sundowning is described as “increased confusion and emotional behavioral disruptions, such as agitation and aggression, particularly during the late afternoon and early evening hours” (Todd, W., 2020). As referenced in an article posted in the Critical Care Nurses Journal, “opioids and benzodiazepine drugs are potentially inappropriate medication classes for the elderly because it can lead to over sedation, leading to more confusion” (Spiegelberg, J. et. al, 2020). In order to prevent this phenomenon, we often promote the use of light therapy.

Elderly patients in the ICU often times experience sun downing. Although it is promoted, light therapy, or the use of light to upkeep the internal day and night cycle, is rarely used. According to Forbes et. al, “a decreased ability to maintain a stable circadian pattern of daytime arousal and nocturnal quiescence may contribute to sleep disruptions” (n.d.). This situation can call for data collection to assess the benefits of using light therapy to prevent situations of sundowning in elderly patients. Data could be collected in the form of tracking events of sundowning and having some of the test population exposed to light therapy and some with loose restrictions. This could produce results that test the effectiveness of light therapy and help establish more strict care that provides a healthier alternative.

A nurse leader could in turn use this information to educate their team on the importance of keeping the lights turned off at night, reducing noise pollution, and promoting restful sleep. This will possibly prevent medicating patients with sedatives they may have never needed. I believe that by using non-pharmacologic interventions, we can reduce the amount of harm and risk of furthering the initial issue. As nurses, it’s our responsibility to do no harm and reduce risk of negative reaction and the information gathered from a figurative study on this topic could make this responsibility more feasible.

References

Forbes, D., Blake, C. M., Thiessen, E. J., Peacock, S., Hawranik, P., & Forbes, D. (n.d.). Light therapy for improving cognition, activities of daily living, sleep, challenging behaviour, and psychiatric disturbances in dementia. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews2.

Spiegelberg, J., Song, H., Pun, B., Webb, P., & Boehm, L. M. (2020). Early Identification of Delirium in Intensive Care Unit Patients: Improving the Quality of Care. Critical Care Nurse40(2), 33–43. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.4037/ccn2020706

Todd, W. D. (2020). Potential Pathways for Circadian Dysfunction and Sundowning-Related Behavioral Aggression in Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias. Frontiers in Neuroscience14, 910. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.00910

Required Readings

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

  • Chapter 1, “Nursing Science and the Foundation of Knowledge” (pp. 7–19)
  • Chapter 2, “Introduction to Information, Information Science, and Information Systems” (pp. 21–33)
  • Chapter 3, “Computer Science and the Foundation of Knowledge Model” (pp.
  • 35–62)

Nagle, L., Sermeus, W., & Junger, A. (2017).  Evolving Role of the Nursing Infomatics Specialist. In J. Murphy, W. Goosen, &  P. Weber  (Eds.), Forecasting Competencies for Nurses in the Future of Connected Health (212-221). Clifton, VA: IMIA and IOS Press. Retrieved from https://serval.unil.ch/resource/serval:BIB_4A0FEA56B8CB.P001/REF

Sweeney, J. (2017). Healthcare informatics. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 21(1).

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Health Informatics and Population Health: Trends in Population Health [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Credit: Provided courtesy of the Laureate International Network of Universities.

Public Health Informatics Institute. (2017). Public Health Informatics: “translating” knowledge for health [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLUygA8Hpfo

cal reasoning and judgment in the formation of knowledge from this experience?

Hi C!

I found your post interesting as I have always heard about sundowning prior to being a nurse, and then seeing patients experience it was eye opening. Along with medications, I found that some of factors that can cause patients to experience sundowning are mental and physical end of day exhaustion, body clock confusion, reduced lighting and increased shadows, disorientation, and lessened amounts of needed sleep (Alzheimer’s Association, n.d.).

With aging it is seen that damage is done to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), or brain clock (MmLearn, n.d.). When researching nonpharmacological strategies to assist patients in the ICU, Amy Karon suggested patients partaking in daytime strategies. They state that patients who were offered activities, such as, number games, notebooks, and occupational therapy, there was a decrease in the number of delirium cases seen (Karon, 2017). Along with this, music therapy, aromatherapy, and using technology to communicate with loved ones can be helpful to calm patients and reorient them (MmLearn, n.d.). Although not exactly known why SCN damage occurs, sleep hygiene should be pertinent for patients at risk for night-time delirium.

As a leader, it would be imperative to find the least harmful solutions to patients experiencing this. It will lead to a decrease in harm, increase fall safety and incidents, and can decrease the length of patient hospital stays. Ultimately, it will lead in an increase in patient and caregiver satisfaction.

References

            Alzheimer’s Association. (n.d.). What is sundowning? Causes & coping strategies. https://www.alz.org/help-support/caregiving/stages-behaviors/sleep-issues-sundowning

Karon, A. (2017). Simple steps help prevent ICU delirium. ACP Hospitalist. https://acphospitalist.org/archives/2017/11/simple-steps-help-prevent-icu-delirium.htm

MmLearn. (n.d.). Sundowning: A guide to difficult behavior at the end of the day. https://training.mmlearn.org/sundowning-a-guide-to-difficult-behavior-at-the-end-of-the-day

RE: Discussion – Week 1

I enjoyed reading your post regarding EMR’s.  Having started my nursing career without the benefit of having a patient’s medical record available on computer, I can appreciate now that most everything healthcare staff may need is now available with the click of a button.  I remember my first role as a nurse on the Med-Surg floor.  When the nurse would get a new patient, we would begin the hunt for the patient’s old chart.  You did not want to be that nurse that did not have the old file up from medical records before the doctor made his rounds.  Many times, there would be a mad dash to try to find the chart.  Often times, it would be in the office of a medical chart reviewer.

Times have definitely changed.  I started working prn on a joint surgical floor.  Many times, I will not even see the doctor when he/she makes rounds.  Twenty-five years ago, the family doctor came in and you were expected to have all lab results, copies of tests etc, waiting with the patient’s chart ready for review by the doctor before the nurse and doctor rounded together.  As I mentioned in a previous post, it was often difficult to decipher the doctor’s writing.  I would sometimes have to refer to the expert on the floor, the secretary on the floor.  Thanks to advances in the lab, test results are available almost instantaneously.

While working in the homecare setting for 23 years, EMR’s have propelled homecare into the 21st century.  If you were on call in home health, the nurse had to carry around three huge binders with patient’s plan of cares with copies of medications.  The nurse never seemed to have the most updated medication profile if a patient called and had questions.  Now, most computer systems used by home health is web based and able to be accessed from your smart phone.  With mobile imaging available, a mobile x-ray can be ordered without having the patient leave their home (Montalto, Shay, And Le, 2015).

There have always been communication failures between physicians and nurses, many times causing adverse events for patients.  Communication technology has vastly improved communication failures between healthcare professionals (Manojlovich, Adler-Milstein, Harrod, Sales, Hoffer, Saint, and Krein, 2015).

References

Manojlovich, M., Adler-Milstein, J., Harrod, M., Sales, A., Hofer, T., Saint, S., and Krein, S.  (2015).  The

Effect of Health Information Technology on Health Care Provider Communication:  A Mixed-Method

Protocol.  JMIR Research Protocols.  doi:  10.2196/resprot.4463.

Montalto, M., Shay, S., and Le, A.  (2015).  Evaluation of a Mobile X-Ray Service for Elderly Residents of

Residential Aged Care Facilities.  Australian Health Review, 517-521.  Retrieved from

https://search-proquest-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/docview/1778450249?accountid=14872.

Hello L,

I enjoy reading your post and its interesting also. The health care industry has been evolving; a lot of changes have been implemented to improve patient care and promote efficiency. Nursing informatics is the combination of nursing science, computer science, and information science vital for the management, communication, and knowledge in nursing practice to better healthcare ( Mcgonigle & Mastrian,2017).

Informatics has been identified as a significant pacesetter in nursing integration, practice, and information dissemination. With the current trend, innovation, and society is driven demand for nursing care, informatics nursing cannot thrive without data accessibility and information. EKG, as you mentioned, is an excellent tool in analyzing and establishing a medical situation, and it enhances a clear understanding of the problem. Overall reasoning and nursing judgment, in most cases, are dependent on knowledge and study of informatics nursing (Nagle, Sermeus & Junger,2017). It is a beneficial equipment that is used to ensure that patients receive quality treatment.

 

                                                          Reference

Nagle, L. M., Sermeus, W., & Junger, A. (2017). Evolving Role of the Nursing Informatics

Specialist. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 232, 212-221.

McGonigle, D,& Mastrian, K.G (2017) Nursing Informatics and Foundation of Knowledge (4th ed).Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Sweeney, J. (2017). Healthcare Informatics. Online Journal of Nursing Informatics, 21(1), 4-1

Rubric Detail

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Name: NURS_5051_Module01_Week01_Discussion_Rubric
Grid View
List View
Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting
45 (45%) – 50 (50%)
Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

Supported by at least three current, credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.
40 (40%) – 44 (44%)
Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.
35 (35%) – 39 (39%)
Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with two credible sources.

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.
0 (0%) – 34 (34%)
Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately.

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible sources.

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.
Main Post: Timeliness
10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response
17 (17%) – 18 (18%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
15 (15%) – 16 (16%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
13 (13%) – 14 (14%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.
0 (0%) – 12 (12%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Second Response
16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.
12 (12%) – 13 (13%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.
0 (0%) – 11 (11%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Participation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100
Name: NURS_5051_Module01_Week01_Discussion_Rubric

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