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Black-white Demarcations of The Past.

Black-white Demarcations of The Past.

Black-white Demarcations of The Past.

Black-white Demarcations of The Past.

NOW FOR AN ORIGINAL PAPER ASSIGNMENT:Black-white Demarcations of The Past.

That is, the increases in the size of these nonwhite populations would lead one to predict less intermarriage as the structural probability of finding by chance alone a spouse from within one’s own racial-ethnic group rises (Kalmijn 1998). Even marriage between black and white Americans, the most histori- cally stigmatized of interracial unions, has steadily increased over the past four and a half decades, from less than 2 percent of either black husbands or black wives having white spouses in 1970 to over 7 percent of black married women having white husbands and nearly 15 percent of black married men having white wives in 2007 (Farley 2009).

We have also witnessed a resulting rise in the numbers of persons with multiracial backgrounds who willingly identify themselves as such, another trend that is signifying that the United States is moving beyond the absolutist black-white demarcations of the past. The multiracial population became especially visible when the 2000 census allowed Americans to mark more than one race as a way to identify themselves in official census terms. In 2008, about 2.2 percent of Americans, or one in forty-five, listed themselves as multiracial (Ruggles et al. 2009). Some analysts have suggested that by the year 2050, the percentage could rise to as much as 20 percent, and by 2100, to as much asThis can happen even when broad acceptance of inter- marriage (a cultural shift) and actual intermarriage (a social-structural shift) are rising at the same time. This may be the situation prevailing today with con- temporary inter-ethnoracial marriage. Among Asians and Latinos, immigra- tion has so rapidly added numbers to their overall population sizes that the probability of endogamy for individuals in these groups has increased consid- erably just because of gains in the sizes of the groups. Thus, examination of population-based trends does not necessarily indicate whether cultural atti-