Assignment: ECH 425 Phonics and Phonemic Awareness

Want create site? With Free visual composer you can do it easy.

Assignment: ECH 425 Phonics and Phonemic Awareness

Assignment: ECH 425 Phonics and Phonemic Awareness

Description

ECH 425 Topic 5 Assignment GCU
ECH 425 Topic 5 Phonics and Phonemic Awareness Lesson Plan

Details:
For this assignment, you may consider curriculum in use as well as other instructional resources. Use the format of one of the “Lesson Plan Templates” to create a lesson plan for a first grade class. The lesson plan should incorporate phonics and phonemic awareness as well as the following information:

Click here to ORDER NOW FOR AN ORIGINAL PAPER ASSIGNMENT :  Assignment: ECH 425 Phonics and Phonemic Awareness

Clear, measurable learning objectives that align to early learning standards (ELS) as well as your state’s subject standards;
Anticipatory set;
Vocabulary;
Reasoning and problem-solving;
Relevant materials and resources including visual or audio resources; and
Differentiation of instruction to address the diverse needs of learners. Name the differentiation strategies used to achieve individual learning outcomes.

APA format is not required, but solid academic writing is expected.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are not required to submit this assignment to Turnitin.

Course Tutor helps in providing the best essay writing service. If you need 100% original papers for ECH 425 Topic 5 Assignment GCU, then contact us through call or live chat.

ECH 425 Topic 5 Assignment GCU

Description

ECH 425 Topic 4 Assignment GCU
ECH 425 Topic 4 Creating a Literacy Environment

Details:
Research 3-5 early childhood classroom environments. Take note of the materials found in each environment and how the rooms are arranged.Create two classroom models that maximize literacy opportunities for young children within two different ages/grades, one in a Birth-PK and the other in K-3.Write a 750-1,000-word explanation of the two classroom models that includes the following:

How you have integrated effective literacy components within each learning environment; and
Rationale for choosing and arranging the objects in each classroom model. Assignment: ECH 425 Phonics and Phonemic Awareness

Use 3-5 scholarly resources to support your research.

Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin.

Course Tutor helps in providing the best essay writing service. If you need 100% original papers for ECH 425 Topic 4 Assignment GCU, then contact us through call or live chat.

ECH 425 Topic 4 Assignment GCU

Image result for Assignment:ECH 425 Phonics and Phonemic Awareness
638 × 826
180 × 234

Phonemic Awareness (PA) is:

  1. the ability to hear and manipulate the sounds in spoken words and the understanding that spoken words and syllables are made up of sequences of speech sounds (Yopp, 1992; see References).
  2. essential to learning to read in an alphabetic writing system, because letters represent sounds or phonemes. Without phonemic awareness, phonics makes little sense.
  3. fundamental to mapping speech to print. If a child cannot hear that “man” and “moon” begin with the same sound or cannot blend the sounds /rrrrrruuuuuunnnnn/ into the word “run”, he or she may have great difficulty connecting sounds with their written symbols or blending sounds to make a word.
  4. essential to learning to read in an alphabetic writing system.
  5. a strong predictor of children who experience early reading success.

An important distinction:

  • Phonemic awareness is NOT phonics.
  • Phonemic awareness is AUDITORY and does not involve words in print.

Phonemic Awareness is important …

  • It requires readers to notice how letters represent sounds. It primes readers for print.
  • It gives readers a way to approach sounding out and reading new words.
  • It helps readers understand the alphabetic principle (that the letters in words are systematically represented by sounds).

…but difficult:

  • Although there are 26 letters in the English language, there are approximately 40 phonemes, or sound units, in the English language. (NOTE: the number of phonemes varies across sources.)
  • Sounds are represented in 250 different spellings (e.g., /f/ as in ph, f, gh, ff).
  • The sound units (phonemes) are not inherently obvious and must be taught. The sounds that make up words are “coarticulated;” that is, they are not distinctly separate from each other.

Go to top of page

Horizontal Line

Definitions of key PA terminology:

  • Phoneme: A phoneme is a speech sound. It is the smallest unit of language and has no inherent meaning.
  • Phonemic Awareness: The ability to hear and manipulate the sounds in spoken words, and the understanding that spoken words and syllables are made up of sequences of speech sounds (Yopp, 1992; see References). Phonemic awareness involves hearing language at the phoneme level.
  • Phonics: use of the code (sound-symbol relationships to recognize words.
  • Phonological Awareness: The ability to hear and manipulate the sound structure of language. This is an encompassing term that involves working with the sounds of language at the word, syllable, and phoneme level.
  • Continuous Sound: A sound that can be prolonged (stretched out) without distortion (e.g., r, s, a, m).
  • Onset-Rime: The onset is the part of the word before the vowel; not all words have onsets. The rime is the part of the word including the vowel and what follows it.
  • Segmentation: The separation of words into phonemes.

Go to top of page

Horizontal Line

Examples of Phonemes

The word “sun” has three phonemes: /s/ /u/ /n/. The table below shows different linguistic units from largest (sentence) to smallest (phoneme).

Sentence The sun shone brightly.
Word sun
Syllable sun, sun-shine, sun-ny
Onset-Rime s-un, s-unshine, s-unny
Phoneme s-u-n

The word “shut” also has three phonemes: /sh/ /u/ /t/.


Examples of Phonemic Awareness Skills

  • Blending: What word am I trying to say? Mmmmm…oooooo…p.
  • Segmentation (first sound isolation): What is the first sound in mop? /m/
  • Segmentation (last sound isolation): What is the last sound in mop? /p/
  • Segmentation (complete): What are all the sounds you hear in mop? /m/ /o/ /p/

What Teachers Should Know What Teachers Should Be Able to Do
  • Definition of phonemic awareness (PA).
  • The relation of phonemic awareness to early reading skills.
  • The developmental continuum of phonemic awareness skills.
  • Which phonemic awareness skills are more important and when they should be taught.
  • Features of phonemes and tasks that influence task difficulty.
  • Terminology (phoneme, PA, continuous sound, onset-rime, segmentation).
  • Assess PA and diagnose difficulties.
  • Produce speech sounds accurately.
  • Use a developmental continuum to select/design PA instruction.
  • Select examples according to complexity of skills, phonemes, word types, and learner experience.
  • Model and deliver PA lessons.
  • Link PA to reading and spelling.
  • Evaluate the design of instructional materials.
(modified from Moats, 1999; see References)

What Does the Lack of Phonemic Awareness Look Like?

Children lacking phonemic awareness skills cannot:

  • group words with similar and dissimilar sounds (mat, mug, sun)
  • blend and split syllables (f oot)
  • blend sounds into words (m_a_n)
  • segment a word as a sequence of sounds (e.g., fish is made up of three phonemes, /f/ , /i/, /sh/)
  • detect and manipulate sounds within words (change r in run to s).

(Kame’enui, et. al., 1997; see References)

Go to top of page

Horizontal Line

Phonemic Awareness Research Says:


“The best predictor of reading difficulty in kindergarten or first grade is the inability to segment words and syllables into constituent sound units (phonemic awareness)” (Lyon, 1995; see References).


The ability to hear and manipulate phonemes plays a causal role in the acquisition of beginning reading skills (Smith, Simmons, & Kame’enui, 1998; see References).


There is considerable evidence that the primary difference between good and poor readers lies in the good reader’s phonological processing ability.


The effects of training phonological awareness and learning to read are mutually supportive. “Reading and phonemic awareness are mutually reinforcing: Phonemic awareness is necessary for reading, and reading, in turn, improves phonemic awareness still further.” (Shaywitz, 2003, see References)

Did you find apk for android? You can find new Free Android Games and apps.