Assignment:ECH 425 Topic 2 Oral Language

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Assignment: ECH 425 Topic 2 Oral Language

Assignment: ECH 425 Topic 2 Oral Language

Description

ECH 425 Topic 2 Assignment GCU
ECH 425 Topic 2 Oral Language

Details:
Create a table including the following:

Five stages of oral language development;
50-100-word description of each stage;
Examples of what the utterances would sound like in each stage; and
Description of a strategy or activity to support each stage (use 3-5 scholarly resources).

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Observe the oral language of and interact with two young children in your family or of friends.

Write a 250-500 word summary of your observations. Explain the stage(s) of language development for each child. Provide specific examples without naming the children.

Submit the table and summary as one deliverable.

Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin.

Course Tutor helps in providing the best essay writing service. If you need 100% original papers for ECH 425 Topic 2 Assignment GCU, then contact us through call or live chat.

ECH 425 Topic 2 Assignment GCUDescription

ECH 425 Topic 1 Assignment GCU
ECH 425 Topic 1 Interviews

Details:
Interview five friends or family members that are parents and/or guardians of a young child. Address the following:

How much do you value literacy in your child’s life?
Describe your daily reading and writing activities alone as well as with your child.
Share your last book sharing experience with your child.
In what ways do you engage your child in the reading?
Share ways you encourage your child to explore early literacy.
How do you respond to your child’s questions and engage your child in conversations? Give specific examples.
What are ways your child attempts to draw or write and how do you encourage these behaviors to be explored?
Include two additional interview questions relevant to family literacy and student success.

In 1,000-1,250-words do the following:

Summarize the interview responses use them to answer to following:

What did you learn from the interview responses?
How will what you learned affect your future classroom?
How will what you learned affect your interaction with families of young children?

Prepare this assignment according to the APA guidelines found in the APA Styl

Image result for Assignment:ECH 425 Topic 6 Early Literacy

e Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin.

Course Tutor helps in providing the best essay writing service. If you need 100% original papers for ECH 425 Topic 1 Assignment GCU, then contact us through call or live chat.

ECH 425 Topic 1 Assignment GCU

Language development in humans is a process starting early in life. Infants start without knowing a language, yet by 10 months, babies can distinguish speech sounds and engage in babbling. Some research has shown that the earliest learning begins in utero when the fetus starts to recognize the sounds and speech patterns of its mother’s voice and differentiate them from other sounds after birth.[1]

Typically, children develop receptive language abilities before their verbal or expressive language develops.[2] Receptive language is the internal processing and understanding of language. As receptive language continues to increase, expressive language begins to slowly develop.

Usually, productive/expressive language is considered to begin with a stage of pre-verbal communication in which infants use gestures and vocalizations to make their intents known to others. According to a general principle of development, new forms then take over old functions, so that children learn words to express the same communicative functions they had already expressed by proverbial means.[3]

Stages

Relationship between interpersonal communication and the stages of development. The greatest development of language occurs in the stage of infancy. As the child matures, the rate of language development decreases.
0-1 years of age:

An infant mainly uses non-verbal communication (mostly gestures) to communicate. For a newborn, crying is the only means of communication. Infants 1-5 months old have different tones of crying that indicate their emotions. Infants also begin laughing at this stage. At 6-7 months old, infants begin to respond to their own name, yell and squeal, and distinguish emotions based on the tone of voice of the mother and father. Between 7 and 10 months the infant starts putting words together, for example “mama” and “dada”, but these words lack meaning and significance. Verbal communication begins at approximately 10-12 months, and the child starts to imitate any sounds they hear, for example animal sounds. The non-verbal communication of infants includes the use of gaze, head orientation and body positioning. Gestures are also widely used as an act of communication. All these stages can be delayed if the parents do not communicate with their infant on a daily basis.[18]
Nonverbal communication begins with the comprehension of parents and how they use it effectively in conversation. Infants are able to break down what adults and others are saying to them and use their comprehension of this communication to produce their own.[19]
1–2 years of age:

Verbal and nonverbal communication are both used at this stage of development. At 12 months, children start to repeat the words they hear. Adults, especially parents, are used as a point of reference for children in terms of the sound of words and what they mean in context of the conversation. Children learn much of their verbal communication through repetition and observing others. If parents do not speak to their children at this age it can become quite difficult for them to learn the essentials of conversation.[20] The vocabulary of a 1–2 year old should consist of 50 words and can be up to 500. Gestures that were used earlier on in development begin to be replaced by words and eventually are only used when needed. Verbal communication is chosen over nonverbal as development progresses.[21]
2–3 years of age:

Children aged 2–3 communicate best in a turn-taking style. This creates a conversational structure that makes it easier for verbal communication to develop. It also teaches patience, kindness, and respect as they learn from the direction of elders that one person should speak at a time. This creates interactional synchrony during their preverbal routines that shapes their interpersonal communication skills early on in their development.[22] Children during this stage in their life also go through a recognition and continuity phase. Children start to see that shared awareness is a factor in communication along with their development of symbolic direction of language. This especially affects the relationship between the child and the caregiver; it is a crucial part of self-discovery for the child when they begin to take ownership over their own actions in a continuous manner.[22]
3–5 years of age:

In this age group children are still learning how to form abstract thoughts and are still communicating concretely. Children begin to be fluent in connecting sounds, syllables, and linking words that make sense together in one thought. They begin to participate in short conversations with others. Stuttering can develop, generally resulting in slowed-down speech with a few letter enunciation errors (f, v, s, z).[23] At the beginning of this stage toddlers tend to be missing function words and misunderstand how to use verb tenses. Over time they start including functional words, pronouns, and auxiliary verbs.[24] This is the stage at which most children can pick up on emotional cues of the tone of adults’ conversation. If negative feedback is distinguished by the child, this ends with fear and avoidance of the associated verbal and nonverbal cues. Toddlers develop the skills to listen and partially understand what another person is saying and can develop an appropriate response.
5–10 years of age:

Much language development during this time period takes place in a school setting. At the beginning of the school age years, a child’s vocabulary expands through exposure to reading, which also helps children to learn more difficult grammatical forms, including plurals and pronouns. They also begin to develop metalinguistic awareness which allows them to reflect and more clearly understand the language they use. They therefore start to understand jokes and riddles. Reading is a gateway for learning new vernacular and having confidence in complex word choices while talking with adults. This is an important developmental stage socially and physiologically for the child.[25] School-aged children can easily be influenced through communication and gestures.[23] As children continue to learn communication, they realize the difference between forms of intentions and understand that there are numerous different ways to express the same intent, with different meaning.[22]
10–18 years of age:

By the age of 10, the child’s cognitive potential has matured and they can participate fully and understand the purpose of their conversations. During this time, the sophistication and effectiveness of communication skills increase and understanding of vocabulary and grammar increases as a result of education. Adolescents go through changes in social interactions and cognitive development that influence the way they communicate.[26] They often use colloquial speech (slang), however, which can increase confusion and misunderstandings.[23] An individual’s style of interpersonal communication depends on who they are communicating with. Their relationships change influencing how they communicate with others. During this period, adolescents tend to communicate less with their parents and more with their friends. When discussions are initiated in different channels of communication, attitude and predispositions are key factors that drive the individual to discuss their feelings. This also shows that respect in communication is a trait in interpersonal communication that is built on throughout development.[25] The end of this adolescent stage is the basis for communication in the adult stage.

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