Assignment: Clinical Nurse Leaders

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Assignment: Clinical Nurse Leaders

Assignment: Clinical Nurse Leaders

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In the realm of marketing, a successful branding strategy is one of the most important contributors to organizational success. A solid branding strategy can help add visibility and credibility to a company’s products.

Similarly, nurse-scholars can build a personal brand to add visibility and credibility to their work. You can begin building your brand by developing and maintaining an academic portfolio. Such an activity can help share the results of your efforts and contribute to your success. This Module’s Discussion asks you to consider and share strategies for building your portfolio.

To Prepare:

  • Reflect on strategies that you can pursue in developing portfolios or portfolio elements that focus on academic achievements.
  • Review one or more samples from your own research of resources focused on portfolio development.

By Day 3 of Week 8

Post an explanation of at least two strategies for including academic activities and accomplishments into your professional portfolio.

See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/51867499

Using Portfolios to Introduce the Clinical Nurse Leader to the Job Market

Article  in  The Journal of nursing administration · January 2012

DOI: 10.1097/NNA.0b013e31823c18e3 · Source: PubMed

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Tommie L Norris

University of Tennessee

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Leslie Mckeon

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

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Donna Herrin-Griffith

University of Alabama at Birmingham

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JONA Volume 42, Number 1, pp 47-51 Copyright B 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

T H E J O U R N A L O F N U R S I N G A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

Using Portfolios to Introduce the Clinical Nurse Leader to the Job Market

Tommie L. Norris, DNS, RN

Sherry S. Webb, DNSc, CNL, NEA-BC

Leslie M. McKeon, PhD, CNL, NEA-BC

Susan R. Jacob, PhD, RN

Donna Herrin-Griffith, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, CENP, FACHE

Development of a portfolio is an effective strategy used by clinical nurse leaders (CNLs) to inform prospective employers of their specialized skills in quality improve- ment, patient safety, error prevention, and teamwork. The portfolio provides evidence of competence relative to the role of clinician, outcomes manager, client advo- cate, educator, information manager, systems analyst/ risk anticipator, team manager, healthcare professional, and lifelong learner. This article describes the CNL portfolio developed by experts from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and Methodist LeBonheur Healthcare. Examples of portfolio docu- ments generated throughout the master’s entryCNL cur- riculum are provided, along with student experiences using the portfolio in the employment interview process.

With more than 1,400 clinical nurse leaders (CNLs) in the United States and increasing enrollment in master’s entry CNL programs, it is critical that CNLs are able to clearly articulate their value. Clarity in this regard is especially important for the newly li- censed CNL. Portfolios provide a format to showcase a unique understanding of patient care and frontline care systems as a dynamic record of growth and pro- fessional development.1 A portfolio is valuable in

the employment process, showing the newly grad- uated CNL’s clinical experience in quality improve- ment (QI) and safety, along with strengths gained from training with content experts. A portfolio, or- ganized similarly to customary career advancement criteria, provides additional value to the CNL by dif- ferentiating the skills and knowledge of the CNL above those of a bedside nurse for potential employers.

This article describes the use of portfolios in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) MSN CNL program to document academic perfor- mance and demonstrate specialized skills to prospective employers. The benefits of portfolios to the nurse em- ployee, academic institutions, and organizations are dis- cussed. Examples from student experiences using the portfolios during the interview process are included.

Background

The healthcare system in the United States has been reported as unsafe and fragmented.2 Fragmentation has been identified as contributing to preventable er- rors, unnecessary mortality, reduced quality of care, and poor outcomes.2 To meet the challenges set fort nurse leaders from academia and practice, cre- ated the CNL role. The role was conceived to address the educational needs for nursing generalists prepared at the graduate level who could work as lateral inte- grators of outcome-based care at the microsystem level.4 The role is anticipated to reduce fragmenta- tion through incorporation of evidenced-based pa- tient care and QI strategies.4

To prepare nurses to meet the IOM mandates, 3 important initiatives were launched.3 In 2004, AACN convened a CNL implementation taskforce

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